Benefit of azilsartan on blood pressure elevation around rest-to-active phase in spontaneously hypertensive rats

Kengo Isegawa, Yoshitaka Hirooka, Takuya Kishi, Keiji Yasukawa, Hideo Utsumi, Kenji Sunagawa

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    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Abnormal elevation of blood pressure in early morning (rest-to-active phase) is suggested to cause cardiovascular events. We investigated whether azilsartan (AZL), a novel potent angiotensin receptor blocker, suppresses blood pressure elevation from the light-rest to dark-active phase in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). AZL has a sustained depressor effect around the rest-to-active phase in SHRs to a greater extent than candesartan (CAN), despite their similar depressor effects for over 24 h. AZL did not cause sympathoexcitation. These results suggest that AZL has a more sustained depressor effect than CAN around the rest-to-active phase in SHRs, and might have advantages for early morning hypertension.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)45-50
    Number of pages6
    JournalClinical and Experimental Hypertension
    Volume37
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Internal Medicine
    • Physiology

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