Big bang in the evolution of extant malaria parasites

Toshiyuki Hayakawa, Richard Culleton, Hiroto Otani, Toshihiro Horii, Kazuyuki Tanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malaria parasites (genus Plasmodium) infect all classes of terrestrial vertebrates and display host specificity in their infections. It is therefore assumed that malaria parasites coevolved intimately with their hosts. Here, we propose a novel scenario of malaria parasite-host coevolution. A phylogenetic tree constructed using the malaria parasite mitochondrial genome reveals that the extant primate, rodent, bird, and reptile parasite lineages rapidly diverged from a common ancestor during an evolutionary short time period. This rapid diversification occurred long after the establishment of the primate, rodent, bird, and reptile host lineages, which implies that host-switch events contributed to the rapid diversification of extant malaria parasite lineages. Interestingly, the rapid diversification coincides with the radiation of the mammalian genera, suggesting that adaptive radiation to new mammalian hosts triggered the rapid diversification of extant malaria parasite lineages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2233-2239
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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malaria
Malaria
parasite
Parasites
parasites
Reptiles
reptile
primate
Primates
rodent
reptiles
Birds
Rodentia
rodents
Radiation
bird
adaptive radiation
Mitochondrial Genome
Plasmodium
host specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Big bang in the evolution of extant malaria parasites. / Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Culleton, Richard; Otani, Hiroto; Horii, Toshihiro; Tanabe, Kazuyuki.

In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 25, No. 10, 01.10.2008, p. 2233-2239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayakawa, T, Culleton, R, Otani, H, Horii, T & Tanabe, K 2008, 'Big bang in the evolution of extant malaria parasites', Molecular Biology and Evolution, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 2233-2239. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msn171
Hayakawa, Toshiyuki ; Culleton, Richard ; Otani, Hiroto ; Horii, Toshihiro ; Tanabe, Kazuyuki. / Big bang in the evolution of extant malaria parasites. In: Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 2233-2239.
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