Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth

Michikazu Hiramatsu, Hiroshi Okubo, Kiyomi Yoshimura, Kuang Liang Huang, Chi Wei Huang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum are closely related species endemic to subtropical islands in the Ryukyu Archipelago and Taiwan. Stem leaf morphology, flowering rate within population and individual net production during the first year seedling growth were determined to clarify whether they can differentiate these two species, and reflect adaptive strategy during species and local population establishment. Four experimental populations of L. longiflorum and five of L. formosanum with different locality covering almost their native distribution were grown under greenhouse condition in the University Farm located in northern Kyushu, Japan. L. longiflorum showed distinct lower ratio of leaf length/width than L. formosanum. Flowering rate and net production tended to decrease along the population location, northward across the archipelago arc and toward higher altitude within the mainland of Taiwan, showing obvious geographic cline (geographically continuous variation). Low degrees of flowering rate and net production in northern L. longiflorum were associated with high frequency of individuals that obtained little net production during spring to summer, indicating an acquired dormancy status. L. formosanum native to about 3000m altitude showed higher resource allocation to the mother bulb. These variations of the growth habits within the species reflect region-specific adaptive strategy of L. longiflorum and L. formosanum for climate during the glacial period and that in highlands of the mainland of Taiwan, respectively. Higher annual net production and an earlier shift to the reproductive phase of L. formosanum is highly likely more advantageous in population establishment under disturbed and competitive environment, where L. longiflorum is rarely found.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages331-334
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9789066058057
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 27 2002

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume570
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

Fingerprint

Lilium formosanum
Lilium longiflorum
interspecific variation
seedling growth
biogeography
flowering
stems
Taiwan
leaves
Japan
Ryukyu Archipelago
growth habit
resource allocation
bulbs
dormancy
intraspecific variation
highlands
indigenous species
greenhouses
climate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Hiramatsu, M., Okubo, H., Yoshimura, K., Huang, K. L., & Huang, C. W. (2002). Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth. In VIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs (pp. 331-334). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 570). International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2002.570.45

Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth. / Hiramatsu, Michikazu; Okubo, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Kiyomi; Huang, Kuang Liang; Huang, Chi Wei.

VIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2002. p. 331-334 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 570).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hiramatsu, M, Okubo, H, Yoshimura, K, Huang, KL & Huang, CW 2002, Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth. in VIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs. Acta Horticulturae, vol. 570, International Society for Horticultural Science, pp. 331-334. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2002.570.45
Hiramatsu M, Okubo H, Yoshimura K, Huang KL, Huang CW. Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth. In VIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs. International Society for Horticultural Science. 2002. p. 331-334. (Acta Horticulturae). https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2002.570.45
Hiramatsu, Michikazu ; Okubo, Hiroshi ; Yoshimura, Kiyomi ; Huang, Kuang Liang ; Huang, Chi Wei. / Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum II - Intra- and interspecific variation in stem leaf morphology, flowering rate and individual net production during the first year seedling growth. VIII International Symposium on Flowerbulbs. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2002. pp. 331-334 (Acta Horticulturae).
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