Blood compatible aspects of poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate) (PMEA)-relationship between protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on PMEA surface

Masaru Tanaka, Tadahiro Motomura, Miho Kawada, Takao Anzai, Kasori Yuu Kasori, Toshifumi Shiroya, Kenichi Shimura, Makoto Onishi, Mochizuki Akira Mochizuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

329 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Platelet adhesion and spreading is suppressed when a poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate) (PMEA) surface is used, compared with other polymer surfaces. To clarify the reason for this suppression, the relationship among the amount of the plasma protein adsorbed onto PMEA, its secondary structure and platelet adhesion was investigated. Poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) and polyacrylate analogous were used as references. The amount of protein adsorbed onto PMEA was very low and similar to that absorbed onto PHEMA. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy was applied to examine changes in the secondary structure of the proteins after adsorption onto the polymer surface. The conformation of the proteins adsorbed onto PHEMA changed considerably, but that of proteins adsorbed onto PMEA differed only a little from the native one. These results suggest that low platelet adhesion and spreading are closely related to the low degree of the denaturation of the protein adsorbed onto PMEA. PMEA could be developed as a promising material to produce a useful blood-contacting surface for medical devices. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1471-1481
Number of pages11
JournalBiomaterials
Volume21
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Platelets
Adsorption
Blood
Blood Platelets
Adhesion
Proteins
Polymers
Secondary Protein Structure
Protein Denaturation
Protein Conformation
Circular Dichroism
Blood Proteins
Spectrum Analysis
Circular dichroism spectroscopy
Denaturation
Equipment and Supplies
Polyacrylates
Conformations
poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate)
Plasmas

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Blood compatible aspects of poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate) (PMEA)-relationship between protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on PMEA surface. / Tanaka, Masaru; Motomura, Tadahiro; Kawada, Miho; Anzai, Takao; Yuu Kasori, Kasori; Shiroya, Toshifumi; Shimura, Kenichi; Onishi, Makoto; Akira Mochizuki, Mochizuki.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 21, No. 14, 01.07.2000, p. 1471-1481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, M, Motomura, T, Kawada, M, Anzai, T, Yuu Kasori, K, Shiroya, T, Shimura, K, Onishi, M & Akira Mochizuki, M 2000, 'Blood compatible aspects of poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate) (PMEA)-relationship between protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on PMEA surface', Biomaterials, vol. 21, no. 14, pp. 1471-1481. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0142-9612(00)00031-4
Tanaka, Masaru ; Motomura, Tadahiro ; Kawada, Miho ; Anzai, Takao ; Yuu Kasori, Kasori ; Shiroya, Toshifumi ; Shimura, Kenichi ; Onishi, Makoto ; Akira Mochizuki, Mochizuki. / Blood compatible aspects of poly(2-methoxyethylacrylate) (PMEA)-relationship between protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on PMEA surface. In: Biomaterials. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 14. pp. 1471-1481.
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