Blood flow velocity of the femoral vein with foot exercise compared to pneumatic foot compression

Koichi Yamashita, Takeshi Yokoyama, Noriko Kitaoka, Tomoki Nishiyama, Masanobu Manabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: To compare the effects of foot exercise with an intermittent pneumatic foot compression (IPC) device on blood flow velocity of the femoral veins. Design: Prospective, controlled study. Setting: General intensive care unit of a university hospital. Patients: 20 patients on bed rest in the intensive care unit. Interventions: Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A, foot exercise (n = 10); and group B, IPC device (n = 10). The foot exercise was done once by a nurse for 5 minutes with the dorsiflexion of the ankle (15 times per minute) in group A patients. The IPC device (A-V Impulse System, compression setting: 130 mm Hg for 3 seconds followed by a resting period of 60 seconds) was used for 2 hours in group B. Measurements: Peak blood flow velocity of the femoral vein was measured using the ultrasound unit with a 7.5-MHz linear array probe (ALOKA SSD-5500) at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. Main results: Peak blood flow velocities in both groups increased significantly vs the control values during the study. At 5 minutes, group A showed a significant increase in the peak blood flow velocity compared with group B. Conclusions: Foot exercise by a nurse for 5 minutes was equally or more effective compared with the IPC device in increasing peak blood flow velocity of the femoral vein. The effect of the 5-minute foot exercise lasted for 2 hours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-105
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

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Femoral Vein
Blood Flow Velocity
Foot
Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices
Exercise
Intensive Care Units
Nurses
Silver Sulfadiazine
Bed Rest
Ankle
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Blood flow velocity of the femoral vein with foot exercise compared to pneumatic foot compression. / Yamashita, Koichi; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Kitaoka, Noriko; Nishiyama, Tomoki; Manabe, Masanobu.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 17, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 102-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamashita, Koichi ; Yokoyama, Takeshi ; Kitaoka, Noriko ; Nishiyama, Tomoki ; Manabe, Masanobu. / Blood flow velocity of the femoral vein with foot exercise compared to pneumatic foot compression. In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 102-105.
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