Body mass index and oxidative DNA damage: A longitudinal study

Tetsuya Mizoue, Shoji Tokunaga, Hiroshi Kasai, Kazuaki Kawai, Masao Sato, Tatsuhiko Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leanness has been shown to be related to an increased risk of some cancer forms, including lung cancer. However, biological evidence supporting a causal link between leanness and carcinogenesis is limited. The authors investigated longitudinally the association between body mass index (BMI) and levels of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, using data from 174 healthy employees who participated in a lifestyle intervention study. 8-OHdG levels were measured using automated high-performance liquid chromatography and adjusted for urinary creatinine levels. Analysis of repeated measurements using a random effects model detected a statistically significant inverse association between BMI and 8-OHdG levels (P = 0.003); one unit decrease in BMI was associated with a 2.7% (95% confidence interval 0.9-4.4) increase in 8-OHdG levels. The association was pronounced among men consuming less than 20 cigarettes per day (8.8% increase per unit decrease in BMI) and among non-smoking men (3.7% increase). The results based on a longitudinal observation suggest that weight loss is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage, a state presumably related to an increased risk of cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1254-1258
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Science
Volume98
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2007

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DNA Damage
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Thinness
Tobacco Products
Life Style
Weight Loss
Lung Neoplasms
Creatinine
Neoplasms
Carcinogenesis
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Observation
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Body mass index and oxidative DNA damage : A longitudinal study. / Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tokunaga, Shoji; Kasai, Hiroshi; Kawai, Kazuaki; Sato, Masao; Kubo, Tatsuhiko.

In: Cancer Science, Vol. 98, No. 8, 01.08.2007, p. 1254-1258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mizoue, T, Tokunaga, S, Kasai, H, Kawai, K, Sato, M & Kubo, T 2007, 'Body mass index and oxidative DNA damage: A longitudinal study', Cancer Science, vol. 98, no. 8, pp. 1254-1258. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2007.00511.x
Mizoue, Tetsuya ; Tokunaga, Shoji ; Kasai, Hiroshi ; Kawai, Kazuaki ; Sato, Masao ; Kubo, Tatsuhiko. / Body mass index and oxidative DNA damage : A longitudinal study. In: Cancer Science. 2007 ; Vol. 98, No. 8. pp. 1254-1258.
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