Body mass index is an independent predictor of long term outcomes in patients hospitalized with heart failure in Japan - A report from the Japanese cardiac registry of heart failure in cardiology (JCARE-CARD)

Sanae Hamaguchi, Miyuki Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Shintaro Kinugawa, Daisuke Goto, Takashi Yokota, Kazutomo Goto, Satoshi Yamada, Hisashi Yokoshiki, Akira Takeshita, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is also associated with an increased risk of death in subjects without CVD. However, in heart failure (HF), elevated body mass index (BMI) has been shown to be associated with better prognosis, but it is unknown whether this is the case in unselected HF patients encountered in routine clinical practice in Japan. Methods and Results: The Japanese Cardiac Registry of Heart Failure in Cardiology (JCARE-CARD) studied prospectively the characteristics and treatments in a broad sample of patients hospitalized with worsening HF and the outcomes were followed for 2.1 years. Study cohort (n=2,488) was classified into 3 groups according to baseline BMI: <20.3 kg/m2 (n=829), 20.3-23.49 kg/m2 (n=832), and ≥23.5 kg/m2 (n=827). The mean BMI was 22.3±4.1 kg/m2. Patients with higher BMI had lower rates of all-cause death, cardiac death, and rehospitalization because of worsening HF. After multivariable adjustment, the risk for all-cause death and cardiac death significantly increased with decreased BMI levels compared with patients with BMI ≥23.5 kg/m2. However, BMI levels were not associated with rehospitalization for worsening HF. Conclusions: Lower BMI was independently associated with increased long-term all-cause, as well as cardiac, mortality in patients with HF encountered in routine clinical practice in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2605-2611
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume74
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 8 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiology
Registries
Japan
Body Mass Index
Heart Failure
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases
Risk Adjustment
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Body mass index is an independent predictor of long term outcomes in patients hospitalized with heart failure in Japan - A report from the Japanese cardiac registry of heart failure in cardiology (JCARE-CARD). / Hamaguchi, Sanae; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Goto, Daisuke; Yokota, Takashi; Goto, Kazutomo; Yamada, Satoshi; Yokoshiki, Hisashi; Takeshita, Akira; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 74, No. 12, 08.12.2010, p. 2605-2611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamaguchi, Sanae ; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki ; Kinugawa, Shintaro ; Goto, Daisuke ; Yokota, Takashi ; Goto, Kazutomo ; Yamada, Satoshi ; Yokoshiki, Hisashi ; Takeshita, Akira ; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki. / Body mass index is an independent predictor of long term outcomes in patients hospitalized with heart failure in Japan - A report from the Japanese cardiac registry of heart failure in cardiology (JCARE-CARD). In: Circulation Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 74, No. 12. pp. 2605-2611.
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AU - Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki

AU - Kinugawa, Shintaro

AU - Goto, Daisuke

AU - Yokota, Takashi

AU - Goto, Kazutomo

AU - Yamada, Satoshi

AU - Yokoshiki, Hisashi

AU - Takeshita, Akira

AU - Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

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