Brief neonatal handling alters sexually dimorphic behaviors in adult rats

Tetsuya Fujimoto, Kazuhiko Kubo, Yasuo Nishikawa, Shuji Aou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several effects of neonatal handling on brain and behavior have been reported. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on behaviors that have been shown to be sexually dimorphic in rats using an open-field test. "Gender differences" were observed in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and grooming in the handled group. However, clear gender differences in these behaviors were not observed in the non-handled group. Our findings show that brief daily handling sessions (∼ 1 min) in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life increased locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, and that these effects were more pronounced in females. Moreover, many rats in the non-handling group exhibited an increase in defecation relative to the handling group during the 10-min observation period. This suggests that the non-handling group experienced more stress in response to the novel open-field arena, and that this resulted in the absence of gender differences. Notably, this anxiety-related response was attenuated by neonatal handling. Our study underscores the impact of brief neonatal handling on sexually dimorphic behaviors, and indicates that caution should be exercised in controlling for the effects of handling between experimental groups, particularly in neurotoxicological studies that evaluate gender differences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-70
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Integrative Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Exploratory Behavior
Locomotion
Grooming
Defecation
Anxiety
Observation
Handling (Psychology)
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Brief neonatal handling alters sexually dimorphic behaviors in adult rats. / Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Kubo, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Yasuo; Aou, Shuji.

In: Journal of Integrative Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 61-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fujimoto, Tetsuya ; Kubo, Kazuhiko ; Nishikawa, Yasuo ; Aou, Shuji. / Brief neonatal handling alters sexually dimorphic behaviors in adult rats. In: Journal of Integrative Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 61-70.
@article{5114047149874a91869fd7ba264e32dd,
title = "Brief neonatal handling alters sexually dimorphic behaviors in adult rats",
abstract = "Several effects of neonatal handling on brain and behavior have been reported. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on behaviors that have been shown to be sexually dimorphic in rats using an open-field test. {"}Gender differences{"} were observed in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and grooming in the handled group. However, clear gender differences in these behaviors were not observed in the non-handled group. Our findings show that brief daily handling sessions (∼ 1 min) in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life increased locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, and that these effects were more pronounced in females. Moreover, many rats in the non-handling group exhibited an increase in defecation relative to the handling group during the 10-min observation period. This suggests that the non-handling group experienced more stress in response to the novel open-field arena, and that this resulted in the absence of gender differences. Notably, this anxiety-related response was attenuated by neonatal handling. Our study underscores the impact of brief neonatal handling on sexually dimorphic behaviors, and indicates that caution should be exercised in controlling for the effects of handling between experimental groups, particularly in neurotoxicological studies that evaluate gender differences.",
author = "Tetsuya Fujimoto and Kazuhiko Kubo and Yasuo Nishikawa and Shuji Aou",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1142/S0219635214500046",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "61--70",
journal = "Journal of Integrative Neuroscience",
issn = "0219-6352",
publisher = "World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief neonatal handling alters sexually dimorphic behaviors in adult rats

AU - Fujimoto, Tetsuya

AU - Kubo, Kazuhiko

AU - Nishikawa, Yasuo

AU - Aou, Shuji

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Several effects of neonatal handling on brain and behavior have been reported. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on behaviors that have been shown to be sexually dimorphic in rats using an open-field test. "Gender differences" were observed in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and grooming in the handled group. However, clear gender differences in these behaviors were not observed in the non-handled group. Our findings show that brief daily handling sessions (∼ 1 min) in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life increased locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, and that these effects were more pronounced in females. Moreover, many rats in the non-handling group exhibited an increase in defecation relative to the handling group during the 10-min observation period. This suggests that the non-handling group experienced more stress in response to the novel open-field arena, and that this resulted in the absence of gender differences. Notably, this anxiety-related response was attenuated by neonatal handling. Our study underscores the impact of brief neonatal handling on sexually dimorphic behaviors, and indicates that caution should be exercised in controlling for the effects of handling between experimental groups, particularly in neurotoxicological studies that evaluate gender differences.

AB - Several effects of neonatal handling on brain and behavior have been reported. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on behaviors that have been shown to be sexually dimorphic in rats using an open-field test. "Gender differences" were observed in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and grooming in the handled group. However, clear gender differences in these behaviors were not observed in the non-handled group. Our findings show that brief daily handling sessions (∼ 1 min) in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life increased locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, and that these effects were more pronounced in females. Moreover, many rats in the non-handling group exhibited an increase in defecation relative to the handling group during the 10-min observation period. This suggests that the non-handling group experienced more stress in response to the novel open-field arena, and that this resulted in the absence of gender differences. Notably, this anxiety-related response was attenuated by neonatal handling. Our study underscores the impact of brief neonatal handling on sexually dimorphic behaviors, and indicates that caution should be exercised in controlling for the effects of handling between experimental groups, particularly in neurotoxicological studies that evaluate gender differences.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898976658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84898976658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1142/S0219635214500046

DO - 10.1142/S0219635214500046

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 61

EP - 70

JO - Journal of Integrative Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Integrative Neuroscience

SN - 0219-6352

IS - 1

ER -