Cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells by substrate immobilization of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 with elastin-like polypeptides

Ayaka Minato, Hirohiko Ise, Mitsuaki Goto, Toshihiro Akaike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The establishment of cardiomyocyte differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a useful strategy for cardiovascular regenerative medicine. Here, we report a strategy for cardiomyocyte differentiation of ESCs using substrate immobilization of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP4) with elastin-like polypeptides. Recently, IGFBP4 was reported to promote cardiomyocyte differentiation of ESCs through inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. However, high amounts of IGFBP4 (approximately 1 μg/mL) were required to inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induce differentiation to cardiomyocytes. We report herein induction of cardiomyocyte differentiation using IGFBP4-immobilized substrates. IGFBP4-immobilized substrates were created by fusion with elastin-like polypeptides. IGFBP4 was stably immobilized to polystyrene dishes through fusion of elastin-like polypeptides. Cardiomyocyte differentiation of ESCs was effectively promoted by strong and continuous inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling with IGFBP4-immobilized substrates. These results demonstrated that IGFBP4 could be immobilized using fusion of elastin-like polypeptides. Our results also demonstrate that substrate immobilization of IGFBP4 is a powerful tool for differentiation of ESCs into cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest that substrate immobilization of soluble factors is a useful technique for differentiation of ESCs in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-523
Number of pages9
JournalBiomaterials
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 4
Elastin
Insulin
Polypeptides
Embryonic Stem Cells
Stem cells
Immobilization
Cardiac Myocytes
Peptides
Substrates
Catenins
Regenerative Medicine
Fusion reactions
Carrier Proteins
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Polystyrenes
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells by substrate immobilization of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 with elastin-like polypeptides. / Minato, Ayaka; Ise, Hirohiko; Goto, Mitsuaki; Akaike, Toshihiro.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 515-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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