Cardiac energetics analysis after aortic valve replacement with 16-mm ATS mechanical valve

Tomoki Ushijima, Yoshihisa Tanoue, Takayuki Uchida, Sho Matsuyama, Takashi Matsumoto, Ryuji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is one of the smallest prosthetic valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a very small aortic annulus, and its clinical outcomes are reportedly satisfactory. Here, we analyzed the left ventricular (LV) performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve, based on the concept of cardiac energetics analysis. Eleven patients who underwent AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve were enrolled in this study. All underwent echocardiographic examination at three time points: before AVR, approximately 1 month after AVR, and approximately 1 year after AVR. LV contractility (end-systolic elastance [Ees]), afterload (effective arterial elastance [Ea]), and efficiency (ventriculoarterial coupling [Ea/Ees] and the stroke work to pressure–volume area ratio [SW/PVA]) were noninvasively measured by echocardiographic data and blood pressure measurement. Ees transiently decreased after AVR and then recovered to the pre-AVR level at the one-year follow-up. Ea significantly decreased in a stepwise manner. Consequently, Ea/Ees and SW/PVA were also significantly improved at the one-year follow-up compared with those before AVR. The midterm LV performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve was satisfactory. AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is validated as an effective treatment for patients with a very small aortic annulus. The cardiac energetics variables, coupling with the conventional hemodynamic variables, can contribute to a better understanding of the patients’ clinical conditions, and those may serve as promising indices of the cardiac function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-257
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Artificial Organs
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Blood pressure
Hemodynamics
Pressure measurement
Prosthetics
Aortic Valve
Stroke
Blood Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cardiac energetics analysis after aortic valve replacement with 16-mm ATS mechanical valve. / Ushijima, Tomoki; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Sho; Matsumoto, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji.

In: Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 250-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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