Cardiopulmonary bypass, steroid administration, and surgical injury synergistically impair memory T cell function and antigen presentation

Tetsuro Sano, Shigeki Morita, Munetaka Masuda, Yukihiro Tomita, Takahiro Nishida, Hideki Tatewaki, Hisataka Yasui

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous reports showed that cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) impair cell-mediated immunity by using antigen-non-specific responses. This study elucidated the effects of cardiac surgery with CPB on antigen-specific immunity. Twenty patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery using CPB were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=10) and group B (n=10) with and without steroid administration, respectively. Group C patients underwent off-pump CABG (n=8). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were taken before and after surgery. Proliferation responses to pure protein derivative antigen were measured. The effects of CPB and steroid on T cell response and antigen-presentation were assessed by cross-stimulation between the preoperative and the postoperative PBMCs. Antigen-specific T cell responses decreased to about 5% of the preopearative values immediately after surgery with CPB, regardless of steroid administration. The T cell response in group B on POD 7 was significantly higher than that in group A. CPB impaired mainly T cell responses, and steroid administration enhanced impairment of T cell response and antigen-presentation. Open-heart surgery with CPB severely impaired antigen-specific immunity. Steroid administration enhanced the impairment of antigen-presentation as well as T cell function, and retarded the recovery of antigen-specific immunity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)598-602
Number of pages5
JournalInteractive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2003

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Viral Tumor Antigens
Intraoperative Complications
Antigen Presentation
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Steroids
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Thoracic Surgery
Immunity
Blood Cells
Recovery of Function
Cellular Immunity
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cardiopulmonary bypass, steroid administration, and surgical injury synergistically impair memory T cell function and antigen presentation. / Sano, Tetsuro; Morita, Shigeki; Masuda, Munetaka; Tomita, Yukihiro; Nishida, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Hideki; Yasui, Hisataka.

In: Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.12.2003, p. 598-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sano, Tetsuro ; Morita, Shigeki ; Masuda, Munetaka ; Tomita, Yukihiro ; Nishida, Takahiro ; Tatewaki, Hideki ; Yasui, Hisataka. / Cardiopulmonary bypass, steroid administration, and surgical injury synergistically impair memory T cell function and antigen presentation. In: Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 598-602.
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