Cardiorespiratory response to low-intensity walking in water and on land in elderly women

Tomoki Shono, Kazutaka Fujishima, Noboru Hotta, Tetsuro Ogaki, Kenji Masumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not the exercise intensity of water-walking for elderly women could be accurately prescribed by heart rate data obtained during treadmill exercise on land. Six healthy female volunteers, with a mean age of 62.2 ± 4.2 years, took part in this study. Walking on land was performed on a treadmill. Each subject completed three consecutive 4-minute walks at a progressively increasing velocity (40, 60 and 80 m-min-1), with a 1-minute rest after both the first and second walks. The room temperature and relative humidity were 24.5 ± 0.2°C and 54.8 ± 4.0%, respectively. Walking in water was performed in a Flowmill, which is a treadmill positioned at the base of a water flume. Each subject completed three consecutive 4-minute walks at a progressively increasing belt and water-flow velocity (20, 30 and 40 m-min-1), with a 1-minute rest after both the first and second walks. The water depth was at the level of the xiphoid process of each subject. The water temperature was 30.7 ± 0.1°C. The exercise intensity at the highest workrate was equivalent to 44.2 ± 10.3% of the heart rate reserve (HRR) during water-walking and 38.4 ± 4.7% of the HRR during land-walking. There was a highly significant linear relationship between heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2) during both water-walking and land-walking. The relationship between HR and V̇O2 in both exercise modes was similar. Thus, the relationship of HR to V̇O2 derived from a treadmill-graded walking test on land may be used to prescribe exercise intensity for water-walking in thermoneutral water.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-274
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of physiological anthropology and applied human science
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2001

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Walking
water
Water
Exercise equipment
Heart Rate
Exercise
Xiphoid Bone
Temperature
Humidity
Flow velocity
Atmospheric humidity
Healthy Volunteers
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Cardiorespiratory response to low-intensity walking in water and on land in elderly women. / Shono, Tomoki; Fujishima, Kazutaka; Hotta, Noboru; Ogaki, Tetsuro; Masumoto, Kenji.

In: Journal of physiological anthropology and applied human science, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.09.2001, p. 269-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shono, Tomoki ; Fujishima, Kazutaka ; Hotta, Noboru ; Ogaki, Tetsuro ; Masumoto, Kenji. / Cardiorespiratory response to low-intensity walking in water and on land in elderly women. In: Journal of physiological anthropology and applied human science. 2001 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 269-274.
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