Cell growth, division, and death in cohesive tissues: A thermodynamic approach

Syunsuke Yabunaka, Philippe Marcq

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell growth, division, and death are defining features of biological tissues that contribute to morphogenesis. In hydrodynamic descriptions of cohesive tissues, their occurrence implies a nonzero rate of variation of cell density. We show how linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics allows us to express this rate as a combination of relevant thermodynamic forces: chemical potential, velocity divergence, and activity. We illustrate the resulting effects of the nonconservation of cell density on simple examples inspired by recent experiments on cell monolayers, considering first the velocity of a spreading front, and second an instability leading to mechanical waves.

Original languageEnglish
Article number022406
JournalPhysical Review E
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 14 2017

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death
division
Division
Thermodynamics
thermodynamics
Cell
cells
nonequilibrium thermodynamics
Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics
Biological Tissue
Morphogenesis
divergence
Chemical Potential
hydrodynamics
occurrences
Hydrodynamics
Divergence
Express
Imply
Experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Cell growth, division, and death in cohesive tissues : A thermodynamic approach. / Yabunaka, Syunsuke; Marcq, Philippe.

In: Physical Review E, Vol. 96, No. 2, 022406, 14.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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