Cell to cell communication by autoinducing peptides in gram-positive bacteria

Mark H.J. Sturme, Michiel Kleerebezem, Jiro Nakayama, Antoon D.L. Akkermans, Elaine E. Vaughan, Willem M. De Vos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While intercellular communication systems in Gram-negative bacteria are often based on homoserine lactones as signalling molecules, it has been shown that autoinducing peptides are involved in intercellular communication in Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these peptides are exported by dedicated systems, posttranslationally modified in various ways, and finally sensed by other cells via membrane-located receptors that are part of two-component regulatory systems. In this way the expression of a variety of functions including virulence, genetic competence and the production of antimicrobial compounds can be modulated in a co-ordinated and cell density- and growth phase-dependent manner. Occasionally the autoinducing peptide has a dual function, such as in the case of nisin that is both a signalling pheromone involved in quorum sensing and an antimicrobial peptide. Moreover, biochemical, genetic and genomic studies have shown that bacteria may contain multiple quorum sensing systems, underlining the importance of intercellular communication. Finally, in some cases different peptides may be recognised by the same receptor, while also hybrid receptors have been constructed that respond to new peptides or show novel responses. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of autoinducing peptide-based quorum sensing systems, their application in various gram-positive bacteria, and the discovery of new systems in natural and engineered ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-243
Number of pages11
JournalAntonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology
Volume81
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 23 2002

Fingerprint

Gram-Positive Bacteria
Cell Communication
Peptides
Quorum Sensing
Nisin
Pheromones
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Mental Competency
Ecosystem
Virulence
Molecular Biology
Cell Count
Cell Membrane
Bacteria
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Cell to cell communication by autoinducing peptides in gram-positive bacteria. / Sturme, Mark H.J.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nakayama, Jiro; Akkermans, Antoon D.L.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; De Vos, Willem M.

In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 81, No. 1-4, 23.11.2002, p. 233-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sturme, Mark H.J. ; Kleerebezem, Michiel ; Nakayama, Jiro ; Akkermans, Antoon D.L. ; Vaughan, Elaine E. ; De Vos, Willem M. / Cell to cell communication by autoinducing peptides in gram-positive bacteria. In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology. 2002 ; Vol. 81, No. 1-4. pp. 233-243.
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