Cervical spine disease is a risk factor for persistent phrenic nerve paresis following interscalene nerve block

Swetha R. Pakala, James D. Beckman, Leonard Lyman Stephen, Victor M. Zayas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of interscalene blocks (ISBs) for shoulder surgery improves postoperative pain control, reduces recovery room times, and reduces overall hospital stays. The most common and potentially disabling adverse effect associated with ISBs is phrenic nerve paresis. Fortunately, persistent phrenic nerve paresis (PPNP) is rare. There are only 4 case reports of PPNP in the English literature. At our institution, we identified 9 cases of PPNP over a 9-year period, representing an incidence of 1 (0.048%) in 2069. In conducting a case-control series, we found that symptomatic cervical spine disease is a risk factor for the development of PPNP. Patients with PPNP had a significantly higher incidence of cervical spine disease (85.7%) compared with the control group (30.9%), P < 0.01. Persistent phrenic nerve paresis remains a perplexing complication of ISB, and many questions remain unanswered. Our data identify an important risk factor that can aid in the risk stratification of patients undergoing ISB.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-242
Number of pages4
JournalRegional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Phrenic Nerve
Nerve Block
Paresis
Spine
Literature
Recovery Room
Incidence
Postoperative Pain
Length of Stay
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Cervical spine disease is a risk factor for persistent phrenic nerve paresis following interscalene nerve block. / Pakala, Swetha R.; Beckman, James D.; Lyman Stephen, Leonard; Zayas, Victor M.

In: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 3, 01.05.2013, p. 239-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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