Characteristics and prognosis of rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors: an analysis of registry data

On behalf of the Kinki GIST Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare. Accordingly, their clinical features are not well-documented and optimal treatment has not been established. The objective of this study is to clarify the rates and patterns of recurrence after surgical resection of rectal GISTs, with a focus on outcomes and therapeutic modalities. Methods: The registry was designed to collect data on rectal GISTs recorded between January, 2003 and December, 2007 at 40 participating institutions of the Kinki GIST Study Group. The principal variables were the rates and patterns of recurrence of rectal GISTs. Other study variables were age, sex, tumor size, mitotic count, distance from the anal verge, tumor location, surgical procedures, surgical margins, and recurrence-free survival. Results: Twenty-four cases were registered, 11 (45.8%) of which were classified as high-risk by the modified NIH criteria. Locoregional recurrence (7/23, 30.4%) was the predominant recurrence pattern after curative resection, with rates that did not differ after local excision (33.3%; 3/9) vs. extended resection (28.6%; 4/14). The recurrence rates were high (25.0%) even for patients with low-risk disease. There was only one case of recurrence among patients who received perioperative treatment with imatinib. Conclusions: Rectal GISTs showed high rates of local recurrence regardless of the surgical procedure. Perioperative treatment with imatinib may improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1188-1194
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery today
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
Rectal Neoplasms
Registries
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Characteristics and prognosis of rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors : an analysis of registry data. / On behalf of the Kinki GIST Study Group.

In: Surgery today, Vol. 47, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 1188-1194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

On behalf of the Kinki GIST Study Group. / Characteristics and prognosis of rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors : an analysis of registry data. In: Surgery today. 2017 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 1188-1194.
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abstract = "Purpose: Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare. Accordingly, their clinical features are not well-documented and optimal treatment has not been established. The objective of this study is to clarify the rates and patterns of recurrence after surgical resection of rectal GISTs, with a focus on outcomes and therapeutic modalities. Methods: The registry was designed to collect data on rectal GISTs recorded between January, 2003 and December, 2007 at 40 participating institutions of the Kinki GIST Study Group. The principal variables were the rates and patterns of recurrence of rectal GISTs. Other study variables were age, sex, tumor size, mitotic count, distance from the anal verge, tumor location, surgical procedures, surgical margins, and recurrence-free survival. Results: Twenty-four cases were registered, 11 (45.8{\%}) of which were classified as high-risk by the modified NIH criteria. Locoregional recurrence (7/23, 30.4{\%}) was the predominant recurrence pattern after curative resection, with rates that did not differ after local excision (33.3{\%}; 3/9) vs. extended resection (28.6{\%}; 4/14). The recurrence rates were high (25.0{\%}) even for patients with low-risk disease. There was only one case of recurrence among patients who received perioperative treatment with imatinib. Conclusions: Rectal GISTs showed high rates of local recurrence regardless of the surgical procedure. Perioperative treatment with imatinib may improve outcomes.",
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AU - Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

AU - Nakashima, Yasuo

AU - Nishida, Toshirou

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N2 - Purpose: Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare. Accordingly, their clinical features are not well-documented and optimal treatment has not been established. The objective of this study is to clarify the rates and patterns of recurrence after surgical resection of rectal GISTs, with a focus on outcomes and therapeutic modalities. Methods: The registry was designed to collect data on rectal GISTs recorded between January, 2003 and December, 2007 at 40 participating institutions of the Kinki GIST Study Group. The principal variables were the rates and patterns of recurrence of rectal GISTs. Other study variables were age, sex, tumor size, mitotic count, distance from the anal verge, tumor location, surgical procedures, surgical margins, and recurrence-free survival. Results: Twenty-four cases were registered, 11 (45.8%) of which were classified as high-risk by the modified NIH criteria. Locoregional recurrence (7/23, 30.4%) was the predominant recurrence pattern after curative resection, with rates that did not differ after local excision (33.3%; 3/9) vs. extended resection (28.6%; 4/14). The recurrence rates were high (25.0%) even for patients with low-risk disease. There was only one case of recurrence among patients who received perioperative treatment with imatinib. Conclusions: Rectal GISTs showed high rates of local recurrence regardless of the surgical procedure. Perioperative treatment with imatinib may improve outcomes.

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