Characteristics of body heat balance of paraplegics during exercise in a hot environment

Masahiro Yamasaki, Kim Kyu Tae, Seung Wook Choi, Satoshi Muraki, Mitsuhisa Shiokawa, Takashi Kurokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the characteristics of body temperature regulation in paraplegics due to spinal cord injury (SCI) during an arm cranking exercise in a hot environment. Twelve paraplegics with lesions located between Th3 and L1,2 and seven able-bodied subjects (AB) participated in this study. The subjects were exposed to a hot (33°C) or a moderate temperature (25°C) environment for one hour and during the last 10 min of the exposure, the subjects performed arm cranking exercises at an exercise intensity of 40 W. The skin temperatures at the chest, the upper arm, the thigh and the calf, the tympanic membrane temperature (Tty), and the skin blood flow of the thigh (SBFT) were continuously monitored during the experiment. Although no systematical variation was found in the Tty at 25°C, the Tty at 33°C in paraplegics during exercise was significantly greater than that at rest (P<0.01), which indicated a pronounced heat stress for paraplegics at 33°C. SBFT of paraplegics with high lesions of the SCI remained unchanged during the experiment at 25°C and 33°C, while paraplegics with low lesions in this study showed consecutive increases in SBFT during exercise in both environmental conditions similar to AB. The increased core temperature in paraplegics with high lesions was considered to be due to a lack of sweat response and vasomotor activity in the paralyzed area. On the basis of the findings in this study, it can be suggested that high core temperature without any increment of SBFT may be characterized as body heat balance of paraplegics with high lesions during exercise in a hot environment. J Physiol Anthropol 20 (4): 227-232, 2001 http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/en/.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-232
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of physiological anthropology and applied human science
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2001

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Thigh
heat
Hot Temperature
Skin
Blood
Arm
Skin Temperature
Spinal Cord Injuries
Temperature
experiment
Tympanic Membrane
Sweat
Body Temperature Regulation
environmental factors
regulation
Thorax
lack
Experiments
Membranes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Characteristics of body heat balance of paraplegics during exercise in a hot environment. / Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kyu Tae, Kim; Choi, Seung Wook; Muraki, Satoshi; Shiokawa, Mitsuhisa; Kurokawa, Takashi.

In: Journal of physiological anthropology and applied human science, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.07.2001, p. 227-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamasaki, Masahiro ; Kyu Tae, Kim ; Choi, Seung Wook ; Muraki, Satoshi ; Shiokawa, Mitsuhisa ; Kurokawa, Takashi. / Characteristics of body heat balance of paraplegics during exercise in a hot environment. In: Journal of physiological anthropology and applied human science. 2001 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 227-232.
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