Characterization of macroporous carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite bodies prepared in different phosphate solutions

Yoong Lee, Yeong Min Hahm, Shigeki Matsuya, Masaharu Nakagawa, Kunio Ishikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Bone mineral of human is different in composition from the stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) in that it contains additional ions, of which CO 3 2- is the most abundant species. Carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (CHA) bodies were prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of highly porous calcium carbonate (CaCO3) body at 120 °C in 1 M M2HPO4 and M3PO4 solutions (M = NH4 or K). It was found that CaCO3 body was almost transformed into CHA body after hydrothermal treatment for 24 h irrespective of type of phosphate solution. However, a small amount of CaCO3 still remained after the treatment in K3PO4 for 48 h. Crystal shape of CHA bodies prepared in those solutions except for K2HPO4 was flake-like, which was different from that (stick-like) of original CaCO3 body used for the preparation of CHA body. CHA prepared in the K2HPO4 showed globule-like crystal. Average pore size and hole size of the CHA bodies were 150, 70 μm and their porosities were about 89% irrespective of the solution. Carbonate content was slightly higher in the CHA bodies obtained from potassium phosphate solutions than in those obtained from ammonium phosphate solutions. Mostly B-type CHA was obtained after the hydrothermal treatment in the potassium phosphate solutions. On the other hand, mixed A- and B-type CHA (ca. 1-2 in molar ratio) was obtained in the ammonium phosphate solutions. The content of CO 3 2- in the CHA body depended on the type of phosphate solution and was slightly larger in the potassium phosphate solutions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7843-7849
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Materials Science
Volume42
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2007

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Carbonates
Durapatite
Hydroxyapatite
Phosphates
Potassium
Carbon Monoxide
Crystals
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium carbonate
Pore size
Minerals
Bone
Porosity
potassium phosphate
Ions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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Characterization of macroporous carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite bodies prepared in different phosphate solutions. / Lee, Yoong; Hahm, Yeong Min; Matsuya, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Masaharu; Ishikawa, Kunio.

In: Journal of Materials Science, Vol. 42, No. 18, 01.09.2007, p. 7843-7849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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