Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study

Hoirun Nisa, Suminori Kono, Guang Yin, Kengo Toyomura, Jun Nagano, Ryuichi Mibu, Masao Tanaka, Yoshihiro Kakeji, Yoshihiko Maehara, Takeshi Okamura, Koji Ikejiri, Kitaroh Futami, Takafumi Maekawa, Yohichi Yasunami, Kenji Takenaka, Hitoshi Ichimiya, Reiji Terasaka

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Abstract

Background: It is uncertain whether smoking is related to colorectal cancer risk. Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are important enzymes in the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens, and functional genetic polymorphisms are known for these enzymes. We investigated the relation of cigarette smoking and related genetic polymorphisms to colorectal cancer risk, with special reference to the interaction between smoking and genetic polymorphism.Methods: We used data from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, including 685 cases and 778 controls who gave informed consent to genetic analysis. Interview was conducted to assess lifestyle factors, and DNA was extracted from buffy coat.Results: In comparison with lifelong nonsmokers, the odds ratios (OR) of colorectal cancer for <400, 400-799 and ≥800 cigarette-years were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.89), 1.16 (0.83-1.62) and 1.14 (0.73-1.77), respectively. A decreased risk associated with light smoking was observed only for colon cancer, and rectal cancer showed an increased risk among those with ≥400 cigarette-years (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04-2.45). None of the polymorphisms under study was singly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Of the gene-gene interactions studied, the composite genotype of CYP1A1*2A or CYP1A1*2C and GSTT1 polymorphisms was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, showing a nearly statistically significant (Pinteraction = 0.06) or significant interaction (Pinteraction = 0.02). The composite genotypes of these two polymorphisms, however, showed no measurable interaction with cigarette smoking in relation to colorectal cancer risk.Conclusions: Cigarette smoking may be associated with increased risk of rectal cancer, but not of colon cancer. The observed interactions between CYP1A1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms warrant further confirmation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number274
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 10 2010

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Genetic Polymorphisms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Smoking
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1
Colonic Neoplasms
Rectal Neoplasms
Tobacco Products
Odds Ratio
Genotype
Confidence Intervals
Enzymes
Glutathione Transferase
Informed Consent
Carcinogens
NAD
Genes
Tobacco
Case-Control Studies
Life Style
Oxidoreductases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk : The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. / Nisa, Hoirun; Kono, Suminori; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 10, 274, 10.06.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nisa, H, Kono, S, Yin, G, Toyomura, K, Nagano, J, Mibu, R, Tanaka, M, Kakeji, Y, Maehara, Y, Okamura, T, Ikejiri, K, Futami, K, Maekawa, T, Yasunami, Y, Takenaka, K, Ichimiya, H & Terasaka, R 2010, 'Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study', BMC Cancer, vol. 10, 274. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-10-274
Nisa, Hoirun ; Kono, Suminori ; Yin, Guang ; Toyomura, Kengo ; Nagano, Jun ; Mibu, Ryuichi ; Tanaka, Masao ; Kakeji, Yoshihiro ; Maehara, Yoshihiko ; Okamura, Takeshi ; Ikejiri, Koji ; Futami, Kitaroh ; Maekawa, Takafumi ; Yasunami, Yohichi ; Takenaka, Kenji ; Ichimiya, Hitoshi ; Terasaka, Reiji. / Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk : The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. In: BMC Cancer. 2010 ; Vol. 10.
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T2 - The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study

AU - Nisa, Hoirun

AU - Kono, Suminori

AU - Yin, Guang

AU - Toyomura, Kengo

AU - Nagano, Jun

AU - Mibu, Ryuichi

AU - Tanaka, Masao

AU - Kakeji, Yoshihiro

AU - Maehara, Yoshihiko

AU - Okamura, Takeshi

AU - Ikejiri, Koji

AU - Futami, Kitaroh

AU - Maekawa, Takafumi

AU - Yasunami, Yohichi

AU - Takenaka, Kenji

AU - Ichimiya, Hitoshi

AU - Terasaka, Reiji

PY - 2010/6/10

Y1 - 2010/6/10

N2 - Background: It is uncertain whether smoking is related to colorectal cancer risk. Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are important enzymes in the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens, and functional genetic polymorphisms are known for these enzymes. We investigated the relation of cigarette smoking and related genetic polymorphisms to colorectal cancer risk, with special reference to the interaction between smoking and genetic polymorphism.Methods: We used data from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, including 685 cases and 778 controls who gave informed consent to genetic analysis. Interview was conducted to assess lifestyle factors, and DNA was extracted from buffy coat.Results: In comparison with lifelong nonsmokers, the odds ratios (OR) of colorectal cancer for <400, 400-799 and ≥800 cigarette-years were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.89), 1.16 (0.83-1.62) and 1.14 (0.73-1.77), respectively. A decreased risk associated with light smoking was observed only for colon cancer, and rectal cancer showed an increased risk among those with ≥400 cigarette-years (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04-2.45). None of the polymorphisms under study was singly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Of the gene-gene interactions studied, the composite genotype of CYP1A1*2A or CYP1A1*2C and GSTT1 polymorphisms was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, showing a nearly statistically significant (Pinteraction = 0.06) or significant interaction (Pinteraction = 0.02). The composite genotypes of these two polymorphisms, however, showed no measurable interaction with cigarette smoking in relation to colorectal cancer risk.Conclusions: Cigarette smoking may be associated with increased risk of rectal cancer, but not of colon cancer. The observed interactions between CYP1A1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms warrant further confirmation.

AB - Background: It is uncertain whether smoking is related to colorectal cancer risk. Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are important enzymes in the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens, and functional genetic polymorphisms are known for these enzymes. We investigated the relation of cigarette smoking and related genetic polymorphisms to colorectal cancer risk, with special reference to the interaction between smoking and genetic polymorphism.Methods: We used data from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, including 685 cases and 778 controls who gave informed consent to genetic analysis. Interview was conducted to assess lifestyle factors, and DNA was extracted from buffy coat.Results: In comparison with lifelong nonsmokers, the odds ratios (OR) of colorectal cancer for <400, 400-799 and ≥800 cigarette-years were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.89), 1.16 (0.83-1.62) and 1.14 (0.73-1.77), respectively. A decreased risk associated with light smoking was observed only for colon cancer, and rectal cancer showed an increased risk among those with ≥400 cigarette-years (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04-2.45). None of the polymorphisms under study was singly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Of the gene-gene interactions studied, the composite genotype of CYP1A1*2A or CYP1A1*2C and GSTT1 polymorphisms was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, showing a nearly statistically significant (Pinteraction = 0.06) or significant interaction (Pinteraction = 0.02). The composite genotypes of these two polymorphisms, however, showed no measurable interaction with cigarette smoking in relation to colorectal cancer risk.Conclusions: Cigarette smoking may be associated with increased risk of rectal cancer, but not of colon cancer. The observed interactions between CYP1A1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms warrant further confirmation.

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