Clinical and radiologic features of malignant neoplasms in organ transplant recipients: Cyclosporine-treated vs untreated patients

H. Honda, T. J. Barloon, E. A. Franken, R. A. Garneau, J. L. Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The radiologic and clinical features of 37 posttransplantation malignant tumors occurring in 33 organ transplant recipients were reviewed to determine the characteristics of the tumors, particularly in relation to previous treatment (or nontreatment) with cyclosporine. The 37 malignant tumors included lymphomas (eight in patients receiving cyclosporine and four in patients not given cyclosporine) and carcinomas of the skin and lips (11), head and neck (five), colon and rectum (three), uterus (two), vulva (two), lung (one), and urinary bladder (one). The neoplasms of the internal viscera and head and neck were relatively advanced when detected. The neoplasms of the skin, vulva, uterine cervix, and urinary bladder were low-grade malignant tumors. Most of the cyclosporine-induced malignant lesions were lymphomas. The lymphomas in clyclosporine-treated recipients were characterized by early appearance after transplantation; more extensive organ involvement; multiple, homogeneous solid lesions without central low density on CT and sonography; and regression after reduction of cyclosporine dose. We conclude that malignant tumors occurring after transplantation are often advanced and that lymphoma induced by cyclosporine has characteristic features.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)271-274
    Number of pages4
    JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
    Volume154
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1990

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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