Clinical influence of cervical spinal canal stenosis on neurological outcome after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury without major fracture or dislocation

Tsuneaki Takao, Seiji Okada, Yuichiro Morishita, Takeshi Maeda, Kensuke Kubota, Ryosuke Ideta, Eiji Mori, Itaru Yugue, Osamu Kawano, Hiroaki Sakai, Takayoshi Ueta, Keiichiro Shiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design: Retrospective case series. Purpose: To clarify the influence of cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) on neurological functional recovery after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without major fracture or dislocation Overview of Literature: The biomechanical etiology of traumatic CSCI remains under discussion and its relationship with CSCS is one of the most controversial issues in the clinical management of traumatic CSCI. Methods: To obtain a relatively uniform background, patients non-surgically treated for an acute C3-4 level CSCI without major fracture or dislocation were selected. We analyzed 58 subjects with traumatic CSCI using T2-weighted mid-sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. The sagittal diameter of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) column, degree of canal stenosis, and neurologic outcomes in motor function, including improvement rate, were assessed. Results: There were no significant relationships between sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3-4 segment and their American Spinal Injury Association motor scores at both admission and discharge. Moreover, no significant relationships were observed between the sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3-4 segment and their neurological recovery during the following period. Conclusions: No relationships between pre-existing CSCS and neurological outcomes were evident after traumatic CSCI. These results suggest that decompression surgery might not be recommended for traumatic CSCI without major fracture or dislocation despite pre-existing CSCS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)536-542
Number of pages7
JournalAsian Spine Journal
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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