Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection

Norihiro Furusyo, Hisashi Nakashima, Kenichiro Kashiwagi, Norihiko Kubo, Kazuhiro Hayashida, Sadakazu Usuda, Shunji Mishiro, Seizaburo Kashiwagi, Jun Hayashi

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Abstract

The aims of this retrospective survey were to determine the epidemiologic distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and analyze the genotype-related clinical differences among Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. The 158 surveyed patients with chronic HBV infection lived in Fukuoka and Okinawa were serially tested for serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). Follow-up was for a period of 10.8 ± 6.4 years (mean ± SD). The HBV genotypes were determined in sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and detection of HBV DNA in serum was done by the transcription-mediated amplification-hybridization protection assay. Genotypes B and C were found in 58 (36.7%) and 100 (63.3%) of the patients, respectively. Genotype B was predominant in Okinawa (B = 86.9%, C = 13.1%), whereas genotype C was predominant in Fukuoka (B = 5.2%, C = 94.8%). The HBeAg positivity and ALT abnormality rates at the start of the observation period were significantly higher in patients with genotype C (66.0% and 84.0%) than in patients with genotype B (34.5% and 22.4%) (P < 0.05, respectively). The annual rate of spontaneous HBeAg disappearance in patients with genotype B was much higher than in patients with genotype C (8.38% versus 2.34%, respectively). Patients with genotype C who were continuously HBeAg negative from entry had a significantly higher ALT abnormality (58.8%) than those with genotype B (19.2%) (P < 0.05). Interestingly, patients with genotype C who became HBeAg negative after treatment with interferon had a high ALT abnormality (58.8%). All patients with an ALT abnormality were positive for HBV DNA in their serum. These findings indicate that patients with HBV genotype C have more severe liver deterioration because of the delay of HBeAg disappearance and continued HBV replication after HBeAg disappearance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-157
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume67
Issue number2 SUPPL.
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2002

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Chronic Hepatitis B
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B virus
Genotype
Hepatitis B e Antigens
Alanine Transaminase
Serum
DNA
Virus Replication
Interferons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Furusyo, N., Nakashima, H., Kashiwagi, K., Kubo, N., Hayashida, K., Usuda, S., ... Hayashi, J. (2002). Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 67(2 SUPPL.), 151-157.

Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. / Furusyo, Norihiro; Nakashima, Hisashi; Kashiwagi, Kenichiro; Kubo, Norihiko; Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Usuda, Sadakazu; Mishiro, Shunji; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo; Hayashi, Jun.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 67, No. 2 SUPPL., 01.08.2002, p. 151-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Furusyo, N, Nakashima, H, Kashiwagi, K, Kubo, N, Hayashida, K, Usuda, S, Mishiro, S, Kashiwagi, S & Hayashi, J 2002, 'Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 67, no. 2 SUPPL., pp. 151-157.
Furusyo N, Nakashima H, Kashiwagi K, Kubo N, Hayashida K, Usuda S et al. Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2002 Aug 1;67(2 SUPPL.):151-157.
Furusyo, Norihiro ; Nakashima, Hisashi ; Kashiwagi, Kenichiro ; Kubo, Norihiko ; Hayashida, Kazuhiro ; Usuda, Sadakazu ; Mishiro, Shunji ; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo ; Hayashi, Jun. / Clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes B and C in Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2002 ; Vol. 67, No. 2 SUPPL. pp. 151-157.
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abstract = "The aims of this retrospective survey were to determine the epidemiologic distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and analyze the genotype-related clinical differences among Japanese patients with chronic HBV infection. The 158 surveyed patients with chronic HBV infection lived in Fukuoka and Okinawa were serially tested for serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). Follow-up was for a period of 10.8 ± 6.4 years (mean ± SD). The HBV genotypes were determined in sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and detection of HBV DNA in serum was done by the transcription-mediated amplification-hybridization protection assay. Genotypes B and C were found in 58 (36.7{\%}) and 100 (63.3{\%}) of the patients, respectively. Genotype B was predominant in Okinawa (B = 86.9{\%}, C = 13.1{\%}), whereas genotype C was predominant in Fukuoka (B = 5.2{\%}, C = 94.8{\%}). The HBeAg positivity and ALT abnormality rates at the start of the observation period were significantly higher in patients with genotype C (66.0{\%} and 84.0{\%}) than in patients with genotype B (34.5{\%} and 22.4{\%}) (P < 0.05, respectively). The annual rate of spontaneous HBeAg disappearance in patients with genotype B was much higher than in patients with genotype C (8.38{\%} versus 2.34{\%}, respectively). Patients with genotype C who were continuously HBeAg negative from entry had a significantly higher ALT abnormality (58.8{\%}) than those with genotype B (19.2{\%}) (P < 0.05). Interestingly, patients with genotype C who became HBeAg negative after treatment with interferon had a high ALT abnormality (58.8{\%}). All patients with an ALT abnormality were positive for HBV DNA in their serum. These findings indicate that patients with HBV genotype C have more severe liver deterioration because of the delay of HBeAg disappearance and continued HBV replication after HBeAg disappearance.",
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