Clinical Significance of Surgical Resection for the Recurrence of Esophageal Cancer After Radical Esophagectomy

Yukiharu Hiyoshi, Masaru Morita, Hiroyuki Kawano, Hajime Otsu, Koji Ando, Shuhei Ito, Yuji Miyamoto, Yasuo Sakamoto, Hiroshi Saeki, Eiji Oki, Tetsuo Ikeda, Hideo Baba, Yoshihiko Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to clarify the clinical significance of surgical resection for recurrent lesions after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

Methods: Recurrence was detected in 113 of 365 consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection for esophageal cancer, and some treatment was performed for recurrence in 100 of the 113 patients. The treatments were classified into two groups: chemotherapy and/or radiation with surgery (surgery group, n = 14) and chemotherapy and/or radiation without surgery (no surgery group, n = 86). The outcomes were retrospectively analyzed.

Results: Of the 14 patients in the surgery group, 3 underwent repeated resection. Thus, a total of 22 resections were performed for these patients. The resected organs were the lymph nodes in nine patients, the lungs in six patients, local recurrence in two patients, subcutaneous recurrence in two patients, the liver in one patient, the brain in one patient, and the parotid gland in one patient. Among the 22 recurrent cases, 20 involved solitary lesions or multiple lesions located in a small resectable region. When the two groups were compared, the surgery group showed a more favorable prognosis in terms of both survival after esophagectomy (median survival time, 103.3 vs 23.1 months; p = 0.0060) and survival after initial recurrence (92.1 vs 12.2 months; p = 0.0057).

Conclusions: Multimodal treatment provides a significant benefit for patients with recurrence after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Surgical intervention should be aggressively included in the treatment strategy when the recurrent lesion is solitary or localized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-246
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Esophagectomy
Esophageal Neoplasms
Recurrence
Survival
Radiation
Drug Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Parotid Gland
Therapeutics
Lymph Nodes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Clinical Significance of Surgical Resection for the Recurrence of Esophageal Cancer After Radical Esophagectomy. / Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Morita, Masaru; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Hajime; Ando, Koji; Ito, Shuhei; Miyamoto, Yuji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 240-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hiyoshi, Y, Morita, M, Kawano, H, Otsu, H, Ando, K, Ito, S, Miyamoto, Y, Sakamoto, Y, Saeki, H, Oki, E, Ikeda, T, Baba, H & Maehara, Y 2015, 'Clinical Significance of Surgical Resection for the Recurrence of Esophageal Cancer After Radical Esophagectomy', Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 240-246. https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-014-3970-5
Hiyoshi, Yukiharu ; Morita, Masaru ; Kawano, Hiroyuki ; Otsu, Hajime ; Ando, Koji ; Ito, Shuhei ; Miyamoto, Yuji ; Sakamoto, Yasuo ; Saeki, Hiroshi ; Oki, Eiji ; Ikeda, Tetsuo ; Baba, Hideo ; Maehara, Yoshihiko. / Clinical Significance of Surgical Resection for the Recurrence of Esophageal Cancer After Radical Esophagectomy. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 240-246.
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AU - Otsu, Hajime

AU - Ando, Koji

AU - Ito, Shuhei

AU - Miyamoto, Yuji

AU - Sakamoto, Yasuo

AU - Saeki, Hiroshi

AU - Oki, Eiji

AU - Ikeda, Tetsuo

AU - Baba, Hideo

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