Colestimide, an anion exchange resin agent, can decrease the number of LDL particles without affecting their size in patients with hyperlipidemia

Noriaki Kishimoto, Satoshi Fujii, Hitoshi Chiba, Ichiro Sakuma, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Recent studies have demonstrated that not only plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, but also the number of small dense LDL particles are involved in the development of arteriosclerosis. Anion exchange resins can reduce plasma LDL levels and affect LDL particle size via increasing triglycerides. In the present study, the effects of short-term colestimide administration on LDL particle size were investigated. Methods: Obese patients with primary hyperlipidemia (n = 21) were administered 3000 mg/day of colestimide for 1 month and fasting blood was obtained before and after the treatment. LDL particle size and number were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprofile using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results: Levels of plasma LDL cholesterol decreased from 155.5 mg/dl to 128.1 mg/dl (p < 0.001) and levels of apolipoprotein B decreased from 139.2 mg/dl to 120.6 mg/dl (p < 0.001) by colestimide administration. Levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride were unaltered. LDL particle size did not change, whereas LDL particle numbers decreased from 1920.3 nmol/l to 1568.8 nmol/l (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Short-term administration of colestimide to patients with hyperlipidemia reduced LDL particle numbers. LDL particle size was not changed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-68
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Cardiology
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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