Combined effects of coffee consumption and serum γ- glutamyltransferase on serum C-reactive protein in middle-aged and elderly Japanese men and women

Ngoc Minh Pham, Wang Zhenjie, Makiko Morita, Ohnaka Keizo, Masahiro Adachi, Hisaya Kawate, Ryoichi Takayanagi, Suminori Kono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The association between coffee intake and circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) may be modified by oxidative stress. The authors examined the relation of coffee consumption to serum CRP considering potential inter-actions of serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and bilirubin. Methods: The subjects included 4455 men and 5942 women aged 49-76 years who participated in the baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases in Fukuoka, Japan. Geometric means of serum CRP and 95% confidence intervals across the category of coffee intake stratified by serum GGT and bilirubin were estimated using multiple linear regression. Results: Serum CRP concentrations were progressively lower with higher intake of coffee in men with high serum GGT (p for trend=0.009), but not in those with low serum GGT (p for trend=0.73) and GGT modified the association (p for interaction=0.03). Women showed no association between coffee intake and CRP whether serum GGT was low or high. There was no effect modification of serum bilirubin on the association between coffee intake and CRP in either men or women. Conclusions: These results support a protective effect of coffee intake against systematic inflammation in middle-aged and elderly Japanese men and imply that such an effect may be stronger in elevated oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1661-1667
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume49
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2011

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Coffee
C-Reactive Protein
Blood Proteins
Serum
Bilirubin
Association reactions
Oxidative stress
Oxidative Stress
Linear regression
Action Potentials
Life Style
Linear Models
Japan
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Inflammation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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Combined effects of coffee consumption and serum γ- glutamyltransferase on serum C-reactive protein in middle-aged and elderly Japanese men and women. / Pham, Ngoc Minh; Zhenjie, Wang; Morita, Makiko; Keizo, Ohnaka; Adachi, Masahiro; Kawate, Hisaya; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kono, Suminori.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 10, 01.10.2011, p. 1661-1667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pham, Ngoc Minh ; Zhenjie, Wang ; Morita, Makiko ; Keizo, Ohnaka ; Adachi, Masahiro ; Kawate, Hisaya ; Takayanagi, Ryoichi ; Kono, Suminori. / Combined effects of coffee consumption and serum γ- glutamyltransferase on serum C-reactive protein in middle-aged and elderly Japanese men and women. In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 49, No. 10. pp. 1661-1667.
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