Comparing the impact of socio-demographic factors associated with traffic injury among older road users and the general population in Japan

Takashi Nagata, Ayako Takamori, Hans Yngve Berg, Marie Hasselberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The increasing number of older road users represents a public health issue because older individuals are more susceptible to traffic injury and mortality than the general population. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic factors and traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Methods. An ecological study was conducted using national data in Japan. Multivariate regression methods were applied to investigate the association of traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users with significant demographic, economic, road traffic, and medical/cultural factors. Results: Income per capita, total road length, and alcohol consumption per person were significantly associated with traffic injury and traffic mortality both for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Income per capita and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic mortality for both groups. Meanwhile, for both groups, income per capita was positively associated with traffic injury, while total road length and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic injury. Conclusions: The effects of socio-demographic factors on traffic injury and traffic mortality in Japan were similar for both the general population and older road users. The study results suggest that injury preventive measures designed for the general population will be beneficial also for older road users in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Article number887
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 24 2012

Fingerprint

Japan
Demography
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Mortality
Alcohol Drinking
Public Health
Economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Comparing the impact of socio-demographic factors associated with traffic injury among older road users and the general population in Japan. / Nagata, Takashi; Takamori, Ayako; Berg, Hans Yngve; Hasselberg, Marie.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 12, No. 1, 887, 24.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{72a4ff83ce1844e1a9494c298a3f985e,
title = "Comparing the impact of socio-demographic factors associated with traffic injury among older road users and the general population in Japan",
abstract = "Background: The increasing number of older road users represents a public health issue because older individuals are more susceptible to traffic injury and mortality than the general population. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic factors and traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Methods. An ecological study was conducted using national data in Japan. Multivariate regression methods were applied to investigate the association of traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users with significant demographic, economic, road traffic, and medical/cultural factors. Results: Income per capita, total road length, and alcohol consumption per person were significantly associated with traffic injury and traffic mortality both for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Income per capita and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic mortality for both groups. Meanwhile, for both groups, income per capita was positively associated with traffic injury, while total road length and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic injury. Conclusions: The effects of socio-demographic factors on traffic injury and traffic mortality in Japan were similar for both the general population and older road users. The study results suggest that injury preventive measures designed for the general population will be beneficial also for older road users in Japan.",
author = "Takashi Nagata and Ayako Takamori and Berg, {Hans Yngve} and Marie Hasselberg",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2458-12-887",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing the impact of socio-demographic factors associated with traffic injury among older road users and the general population in Japan

AU - Nagata, Takashi

AU - Takamori, Ayako

AU - Berg, Hans Yngve

AU - Hasselberg, Marie

PY - 2012/10/24

Y1 - 2012/10/24

N2 - Background: The increasing number of older road users represents a public health issue because older individuals are more susceptible to traffic injury and mortality than the general population. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic factors and traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Methods. An ecological study was conducted using national data in Japan. Multivariate regression methods were applied to investigate the association of traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users with significant demographic, economic, road traffic, and medical/cultural factors. Results: Income per capita, total road length, and alcohol consumption per person were significantly associated with traffic injury and traffic mortality both for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Income per capita and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic mortality for both groups. Meanwhile, for both groups, income per capita was positively associated with traffic injury, while total road length and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic injury. Conclusions: The effects of socio-demographic factors on traffic injury and traffic mortality in Japan were similar for both the general population and older road users. The study results suggest that injury preventive measures designed for the general population will be beneficial also for older road users in Japan.

AB - Background: The increasing number of older road users represents a public health issue because older individuals are more susceptible to traffic injury and mortality than the general population. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic factors and traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Methods. An ecological study was conducted using national data in Japan. Multivariate regression methods were applied to investigate the association of traffic injury and traffic mortality for the general population and among older road users with significant demographic, economic, road traffic, and medical/cultural factors. Results: Income per capita, total road length, and alcohol consumption per person were significantly associated with traffic injury and traffic mortality both for the general population and among older road users in Japan. Income per capita and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic mortality for both groups. Meanwhile, for both groups, income per capita was positively associated with traffic injury, while total road length and alcohol consumption per person were negatively associated with traffic injury. Conclusions: The effects of socio-demographic factors on traffic injury and traffic mortality in Japan were similar for both the general population and older road users. The study results suggest that injury preventive measures designed for the general population will be beneficial also for older road users in Japan.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84867607382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84867607382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2458-12-887

DO - 10.1186/1471-2458-12-887

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

IS - 1

M1 - 887

ER -