Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat

Takashi Naito, Tetsuro Ogaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-cooling and fluid replacement with either crushed ice or cold water. Methods On 2 separate occasions, in a counterbalanced order, 9 recreationally-trained males ingested 1.25 g/kg (80–100 g) of either crushed ice (0.5°C) or cold water (4°C) every 5 min for 30 min before exercise. They also ingested 2.0 g/kg (130–160 g) of the same treatment drink at 15 min, 30 min, and 45 min after the commencement of cycling to exhaustion at 60%VO2max until voluntary exhaustion in a hot environment (35°C and 30% relative humidity). Results The cycling time to exhaustion in the crushed ice trial (50.0 ± 12.2 min) was longer than the cold water trial (42.2 ± 10.1 min; p = 0.02). Although the rectal temperature fell by 0.37°C ± 0.03°C (p = 0.01) at the end of the resting period after the crushed ice ingestion, the rates of rise in rectal temperature during the exercise period were not significantly different between these 2 conditions (crushed ice: 0.23°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; cold water: 0.22°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; p = 0.94). Conclusion Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-117
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sport and Health Science
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ice
Eating
Hot Temperature
Water
Temperature
Humidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat. / Naito, Takashi; Ogaki, Tetsuro.

In: Journal of Sport and Health Science, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 111-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{992859ab4ad34d2ca4bf992e469b73bd,
title = "Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat",
abstract = "Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-cooling and fluid replacement with either crushed ice or cold water. Methods On 2 separate occasions, in a counterbalanced order, 9 recreationally-trained males ingested 1.25 g/kg (80–100 g) of either crushed ice (0.5°C) or cold water (4°C) every 5 min for 30 min before exercise. They also ingested 2.0 g/kg (130–160 g) of the same treatment drink at 15 min, 30 min, and 45 min after the commencement of cycling to exhaustion at 60{\%}VO2max until voluntary exhaustion in a hot environment (35°C and 30{\%} relative humidity). Results The cycling time to exhaustion in the crushed ice trial (50.0 ± 12.2 min) was longer than the cold water trial (42.2 ± 10.1 min; p = 0.02). Although the rectal temperature fell by 0.37°C ± 0.03°C (p = 0.01) at the end of the resting period after the crushed ice ingestion, the rates of rise in rectal temperature during the exercise period were not significantly different between these 2 conditions (crushed ice: 0.23°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; cold water: 0.22°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; p = 0.94). Conclusion Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.",
author = "Takashi Naito and Tetsuro Ogaki",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jshs.2015.12.002",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "111--117",
journal = "Journal of Sport and Health Science",
issn = "2095-2546",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat

AU - Naito, Takashi

AU - Ogaki, Tetsuro

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-cooling and fluid replacement with either crushed ice or cold water. Methods On 2 separate occasions, in a counterbalanced order, 9 recreationally-trained males ingested 1.25 g/kg (80–100 g) of either crushed ice (0.5°C) or cold water (4°C) every 5 min for 30 min before exercise. They also ingested 2.0 g/kg (130–160 g) of the same treatment drink at 15 min, 30 min, and 45 min after the commencement of cycling to exhaustion at 60%VO2max until voluntary exhaustion in a hot environment (35°C and 30% relative humidity). Results The cycling time to exhaustion in the crushed ice trial (50.0 ± 12.2 min) was longer than the cold water trial (42.2 ± 10.1 min; p = 0.02). Although the rectal temperature fell by 0.37°C ± 0.03°C (p = 0.01) at the end of the resting period after the crushed ice ingestion, the rates of rise in rectal temperature during the exercise period were not significantly different between these 2 conditions (crushed ice: 0.23°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; cold water: 0.22°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; p = 0.94). Conclusion Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.

AB - Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pre-cooling and fluid replacement with either crushed ice or cold water. Methods On 2 separate occasions, in a counterbalanced order, 9 recreationally-trained males ingested 1.25 g/kg (80–100 g) of either crushed ice (0.5°C) or cold water (4°C) every 5 min for 30 min before exercise. They also ingested 2.0 g/kg (130–160 g) of the same treatment drink at 15 min, 30 min, and 45 min after the commencement of cycling to exhaustion at 60%VO2max until voluntary exhaustion in a hot environment (35°C and 30% relative humidity). Results The cycling time to exhaustion in the crushed ice trial (50.0 ± 12.2 min) was longer than the cold water trial (42.2 ± 10.1 min; p = 0.02). Although the rectal temperature fell by 0.37°C ± 0.03°C (p = 0.01) at the end of the resting period after the crushed ice ingestion, the rates of rise in rectal temperature during the exercise period were not significantly different between these 2 conditions (crushed ice: 0.23°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; cold water: 0.22°C ± 0.07°C, 5 min; p = 0.94). Conclusion Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006215464&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85006215464&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jshs.2015.12.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jshs.2015.12.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85006215464

VL - 6

SP - 111

EP - 117

JO - Journal of Sport and Health Science

JF - Journal of Sport and Health Science

SN - 2095-2546

IS - 1

ER -