Comparison of the genetic diversity of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and cultivated rice (O. sativa L.) using RFLP markers

C. Q. Sun, X. K. Wang, Z. C. Li, Atsushi Yoshimura, N. Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forty fourth single-copy RFLP markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 122 accessions of common wild rice (CWR, Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and 75 entries of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) from more than ten Asian countries. A comparison of the parameters showing genetic diversity, including the percentage of polymorphic loci (P), the average number of alleles per locus (A), the number of genotypes (Ng), the average heterozygosity (Ho) and the average genetic multiplicity (Hs) of CWR and indica and japonica subspecies of cultivated rice from different countries and regions, indicated that CWR from China possesses the highest genetic diversity, followed by CWR from South Asia and Southeast Asia. The genetic diversity of CWR from India is the second highest. Although the average gene diversity (Hs)of the South Asian CWR is higher than that of the Southeast Asian CWR, its percentage of polymorphic loci (P), number of alleles (Na) and number of genotypes (Ng) are all smaller. It was also found that the genetic diversity of cultivated rice is obviously lower than that of CWR. At the 44 loci investigated, the number of polymorphic loci of cultivated rice is only 3/4 that of CWR, while the number of alleles, 60%, and the number of genotypes is about 1/2 that of CWR. Of the two subspecies studied, the genetic diversity of indica is higher than that of japonica. The average heterozygosity of the Chinese CWR is the highest among all the entries studied. The average heterozygosity of CWR is about two-times that of cultivated rice. It is suggested that during the course of evolution from wild rice to cultivated rice, many alleles were lost through natural and human selection, leading to the lower heterozygosity and genetic diversity of the cultivated rice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 21 2001

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Oryza rufipogon
wild rice
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Oryza sativa
restriction fragment length polymorphism
rice
genetic variation
heterozygosity
loci
alleles
Alleles
genotype
Genotype
South Asia
Oryza
South East Asia
Southeastern Asia
Genetic Selection
India
China

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics

Cite this

Comparison of the genetic diversity of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and cultivated rice (O. sativa L.) using RFLP markers. / Sun, C. Q.; Wang, X. K.; Li, Z. C.; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Iwata, N.

In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Vol. 102, No. 1, 21.02.2001, p. 157-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, C. Q. ; Wang, X. K. ; Li, Z. C. ; Yoshimura, Atsushi ; Iwata, N. / Comparison of the genetic diversity of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) and cultivated rice (O. sativa L.) using RFLP markers. In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 2001 ; Vol. 102, No. 1. pp. 157-162.
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