Computer simulation based on in vivo kinematics of a replaced hip during chair-rising for elucidating target cup and stem positioning with a safety range of hip rotation

Kyohei Shiomoto, Satoshi Hamai, Satoru Ikebe, Hidehiko Higaki, Daisuke Hara, Hirotaka Gondo, Keisuke Komiyama, Kensei Yoshimoto, Satoru Harada, Yasuharu Nakashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background After total hip arthroplasty, dislocation can occur when a patient unexpectedly assumes internal/external limb positions, even during chair-rising, which is a frequently activity of daily life. Therefore, determining the target cup position to avoid impingement in unexpected limb positions using in vivo data of daily life activities is critical. Methods A computer simulation was performed on 21 total hip arthroplasty patients using patient-specific component placements and hip kinematics obtained during chair-rising analysis using image-matching techniques. The liner-to-neck distance and impingement were evaluated by simulating the change in internal/external rotation angle at maximum hip flexion/extension from 0 to 90°. The cutoff values of cup anteversion and combined anteversion at 60° of internal/external rotation were determined. Findings The anterior/posterior liner-to-neck distances were negatively correlated with internal/external rotation angles (r = −0.82 and −0.78, respectively) and decreased by 1.7 and 1.8 mm for every 15° increase, respectively. Three cases (14%) of anterior/posterior impingement were observed at 60° of internal/external rotation angle, respectively. The cutoff values for cup anteversion and combined anteversion to avoid impingement at 60° of internal/external rotation angle were 12°–25°/38°–62°, respectively. The stem anteversion, adjustable by cup anteversion to meet both the target cup anteversion and combined anteversion, was 13°–50°. Interpretation Simulated unintentional internal or external hip rotation, even during chair-rising, caused impingement and posed a dislocation risk. If the stem anteversion is excessively small or large in meeting the target combined anteversion, adjustments to stem anteversion could be recommended in addition to adjustments in cup anteversion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105537
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume91
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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