Conservation of novel Mahya genes shows the existence of neural functions common between Hymenoptera and Deuterostome

Mayumi Tsuchimoto, Shinobu Yasuo, Masahiro Funada, Makoto Aoki, Hiromi Sasagawa, Takashi Yoshimura, Osamu Tadauchi, Sydney A. Cameron, Yasuo Kitagawa, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Honeybees have been shown to exhibit cognitive performances that were thought to be specific to some vertebrates. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of such cognitive abilities of the bees have not been understood. We have identified a novel gene, Mahya, expressed in the brain of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and other Hymenoptera. Mahya orthologues are present in Deuterostomes but are absent or highly diverged in nematodes and, intriguingly, in two dipteran insects (fruit fly and mosquito) and Lepidoptera (silk moth). Mahya genes encode novel secretory proteins with a follistatin-like domain (Kazal-type serine/ threonine protease inhibitor domain and EF-hand calcium-binding domain), two immunoglobulin domains, and a C-terminal novel domain. Honeybee Mahya is expressed in the mushroom bodies and antennal lobes of the brain. Zebra fish Mahya orthologues are expressed in the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, habenula, optic tectum, and cerebellum of the brain. Mouse Mahya orthologues are expressed in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the brain. These results suggest that Mahya may be involved in learning and memory and in processing of sensory information in Hymenoptera and vertebrates. Furthermore, the limited existence of Mahya in the genomes of Hymenoptera and Deuterostomes supports the hypothesis that the genes typically represented by Mahya were lost or highly diverged during the evolution of the central nervous system of specific Bilaterian branches under the specific selection and subsequent adaptation associated with different ecologies and life histories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)564-574
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopment Genes and Evolution
Volume215
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Hymenoptera
Olfactory Bulb
Bees
Brain
Cerebellum
Genes
Vertebrates
Mushroom Bodies
Follistatin
Habenula
EF Hand Motifs
Telencephalon
Lepidoptera
Serine Proteinase Inhibitors
Aptitude
Silk
Moths
Superior Colliculi
Zebrafish
Threonine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Conservation of novel Mahya genes shows the existence of neural functions common between Hymenoptera and Deuterostome. / Tsuchimoto, Mayumi; Yasuo, Shinobu; Funada, Masahiro; Aoki, Makoto; Sasagawa, Hiromi; Yoshimura, Takashi; Tadauchi, Osamu; Cameron, Sydney A.; Kitagawa, Yasuo; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko.

In: Development Genes and Evolution, Vol. 215, No. 11, 01.11.2005, p. 564-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsuchimoto, M, Yasuo, S, Funada, M, Aoki, M, Sasagawa, H, Yoshimura, T, Tadauchi, O, Cameron, SA, Kitagawa, Y & Kadowaki, T 2005, 'Conservation of novel Mahya genes shows the existence of neural functions common between Hymenoptera and Deuterostome', Development Genes and Evolution, vol. 215, no. 11, pp. 564-574. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00427-005-0021-z
Tsuchimoto, Mayumi ; Yasuo, Shinobu ; Funada, Masahiro ; Aoki, Makoto ; Sasagawa, Hiromi ; Yoshimura, Takashi ; Tadauchi, Osamu ; Cameron, Sydney A. ; Kitagawa, Yasuo ; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko. / Conservation of novel Mahya genes shows the existence of neural functions common between Hymenoptera and Deuterostome. In: Development Genes and Evolution. 2005 ; Vol. 215, No. 11. pp. 564-574.
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