Contribution of afferent renal nerve signals to acute and chronic blood pressure regulation in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats

Shota Ikeda, keisuke shinohara, Soichiro Kashihara, Sho Matsumoto, Daisuke Yoshida, Ryosuke Nakashima, Yoshiyasu Ono, Masaaki Nishihara, Kenichi Katsurada, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The activation of sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in the development of hypertension. The input from afferent renal nerves may affect central sympathetic outflow; however, its contribution to the development of hypertension remains unclear. We investigated the role of afferent renal nerves in acute and chronic blood pressure regulation using normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Acute chemical stimulation of afferent renal nerves elicited larger increases in blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity in young 9-week-old SHRSP compared to WKY. Selective afferent renal denervation (ARDN) and conventional total renal denervation (TRDN) ablating both afferent and efferent nerves in young SHRSP revealed that only TRDN, but not ARDN, chronically attenuated blood pressure elevation. ARDN did not affect plasma renin activity or plasma angiotensin II levels, whereas TRDN decreased both. Neither TRDN nor ARDN affected central sympathetic outflow and systemic sympathetic activity determined by neuronal activity in the parvocellular region of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla and by plasma and urinary norepinephrine levels, respectively. Renal injury was not apparent in young SHRSP compared with WKY, suggesting that renal afferent input might not be activated in young SHRSP. In conclusion, the chronic input from afferent renal nerves does not contribute to the development of hypertension in SHRSP despite the increased blood pressure response to the acute stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Efferent renal nerves may be involved in the development of hypertension via activation of the renin-angiotensin system in SHRSP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHypertension Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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