Contributions of matrix and large protein genes of the measles virus Edmonston strain to growth in cultured cells as revealed by recombinant viruses

Maino Tahara, Makoto Takeda, Yusuke Yanagi

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) was obtained by sequential passages of the original isolate in various cultured cells. Although attenuated in vivo, it grows efficiently in most primate cell lines. Previous studies have revealed that MV tropism cannot be solely explained by the use of CD150 and/or CD46 as a cellular receptor. In order to evaluate the contributions of individual genes of the Edmonston strain to growth in cultured cells, we generated a series of recombinant viruses in which part of the genome of the clinical isolate IC-B (which uses CD150 as a receptor) was replaced with the corresponding sequences of the Edmonston strain. The recombinant virus possessing the Edmonston hemagglutinin (H) gene (encoding the receptor-binding protein) grew as efficiently in Vero cells as the Edmonston strain. Those viruses having either the matrix (M) or large (L) protein gene from the Edmonston strain could also replicate well in Vero cells, although they entered them at low efficiencies. P64S and E89K substitutions were responsible for the ability of the M protein to make virus grow efficiently in Vero cells, while the first half of the Edmonston L gene was important for better replication. Despite efficient growth in Vero cells, the recombinant viruses with these mutations had growth disadvantage in CD150-positive lymphoid B95a cells. Thus, not only the H gene but also the M and L genes contribute to efficient replication of the Edmonston strain in some cultured cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15218-15225
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of virology
Volume79
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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