CO2 efflux from subterranean nests of ant communities in a seasonal tropical forest, Thailand

Sasitorn Hasin, Mizue Ohashi, Akinori Yamada, Yoshiaki Hashimoto, Wattanachai Tasen, Tomonori Kume, Seiki Yamane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many ant species construct subterranean nests. The presence of their nests may explain soil respiration "hot spots", an important factor in the high CO2 efflux from tropical forests. However, no studies have directly measured CO2 efflux from ant nests. We established 61 experimental plots containing 13 subterranean ant species to evaluate the CO2 efflux from subterranean ant nests in a tropical seasonal forest, Thailand. We examined differences in nest CO2 efflux among ant species. We determined the effects of environmental factors on nest CO2 efflux and calculated an index of nest structure. The mean CO2 efflux from nests was significantly higher than those from the surrounding soil in the wet and dry seasons. The CO2 efflux was species-specific, showing significant differences among the 13 ant species. The soil moisture content significantly affected nest CO2 efflux, but there was no clear relationship between nest CO2 efflux and nest soil temperature. The diameter of the nest entrance hole affected CO2 efflux. However, there was no significant difference in CO2 efflux rates between single-hole and multiple-hole nests. Our results suggest that in a tropical forest ecosystem the increase in CO2 efflux from subterranean ant nests is caused by species-specific activity of ants, the nest soil environment, and nest structure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3929-3939
Number of pages11
JournalEcology and Evolution
Volume4
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2014

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ant nests
tropical forests
tropical forest
ant
Thailand
nest
nests
Formicidae
nest structure
edaphic factors
soil respiration
forest ecosystems
soil temperature
soil water content
dry season
wet season

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

CO2 efflux from subterranean nests of ant communities in a seasonal tropical forest, Thailand. / Hasin, Sasitorn; Ohashi, Mizue; Yamada, Akinori; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Tasen, Wattanachai; Kume, Tomonori; Yamane, Seiki.

In: Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 4, No. 20, 01.10.2014, p. 3929-3939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hasin, S, Ohashi, M, Yamada, A, Hashimoto, Y, Tasen, W, Kume, T & Yamane, S 2014, 'CO2 efflux from subterranean nests of ant communities in a seasonal tropical forest, Thailand', Ecology and Evolution, vol. 4, no. 20, pp. 3929-3939. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1255
Hasin, Sasitorn ; Ohashi, Mizue ; Yamada, Akinori ; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki ; Tasen, Wattanachai ; Kume, Tomonori ; Yamane, Seiki. / CO2 efflux from subterranean nests of ant communities in a seasonal tropical forest, Thailand. In: Ecology and Evolution. 2014 ; Vol. 4, No. 20. pp. 3929-3939.
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