Dairy consumption and risk of functional disability in an elderly Japanese population: The Hisayama Study

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Abstract

Background: Little is known about the association between dairy intake and risk of functional disability in the elderly. Objectives: We examined the influence of dairy intake on the development of declining functional capacity and activities of daily living (ADL) in a prospective cohort study of an elderly population. Methods: A total of 859 community-dwelling Japanese residents, aged ?65 y without functional disability, were followed up for 7 y. Functional capacity impairment was defined as a TokyoMetropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence score of ≥12, and ADL disability was defined as a Barthel Index score of ≥95. Dairy intake was evaluated using a 150-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, grouped into quartiles. The RR of dairy intake on incident functional disabilitywas computed using a Poisson regression model. Results: The multivariable-Adjusted RR of impaired functional capacity decreased significantly with increasing dairy intake levels (RR [95% CI]: quartile 1, 1.00 [reference]; quartile 2, 0.85 [0.71, 1.02]; quartile 3, 0.81 [0.68, 0.98]; and quartile 4, 0.74 [0.61, 0.90]; P-Trend = 0.001). Regarding the three subscales of functional capacity, the inverse association between dairy intake and risk for impairment of intellectual activity and social role remained significant (P-Trend = 0.0009 and 0.02, respectively), but such an association was not observed for instrumental ADL. The multivariable-Adjusted risk of ADL disability also decreased weakly but significantly with elevating dairy intake (P-Trend=0.04). A similar association was seen for severity of functional disability (P-Trend = 0.002). However, the magnitude of these associations was attenuated after further adjustment for protein intake. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that higher dairy intake is associated with a lower risk of functional disability and its progression in the elderly, probably via an increase in protein intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1664-1671
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume109
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2019

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Activities of Daily Living
Population
Independent Living
Geriatrics
Mental Competency
Proteins
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{38e167db8d1f4f48b5aba9f10e920937,
title = "Dairy consumption and risk of functional disability in an elderly Japanese population: The Hisayama Study",
abstract = "Background: Little is known about the association between dairy intake and risk of functional disability in the elderly. Objectives: We examined the influence of dairy intake on the development of declining functional capacity and activities of daily living (ADL) in a prospective cohort study of an elderly population. Methods: A total of 859 community-dwelling Japanese residents, aged ?65 y without functional disability, were followed up for 7 y. Functional capacity impairment was defined as a TokyoMetropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence score of ≥12, and ADL disability was defined as a Barthel Index score of ≥95. Dairy intake was evaluated using a 150-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, grouped into quartiles. The RR of dairy intake on incident functional disabilitywas computed using a Poisson regression model. Results: The multivariable-Adjusted RR of impaired functional capacity decreased significantly with increasing dairy intake levels (RR [95{\%} CI]: quartile 1, 1.00 [reference]; quartile 2, 0.85 [0.71, 1.02]; quartile 3, 0.81 [0.68, 0.98]; and quartile 4, 0.74 [0.61, 0.90]; P-Trend = 0.001). Regarding the three subscales of functional capacity, the inverse association between dairy intake and risk for impairment of intellectual activity and social role remained significant (P-Trend = 0.0009 and 0.02, respectively), but such an association was not observed for instrumental ADL. The multivariable-Adjusted risk of ADL disability also decreased weakly but significantly with elevating dairy intake (P-Trend=0.04). A similar association was seen for severity of functional disability (P-Trend = 0.002). However, the magnitude of these associations was attenuated after further adjustment for protein intake. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that higher dairy intake is associated with a lower risk of functional disability and its progression in the elderly, probably via an increase in protein intake.",
author = "Daigo Yoshida and Tomoyuki Ohara and Jun Hata and Mao Shibata and Yoichiro Hirakawa and Takanori Honda and Kazuhiro Uchida and Satoshi Takasugi and Takanari Kitazono and Yutaka Kiyohara and Toshiharu Ninomiya",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ajcn/nqz040",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "1664--1671",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Dairy consumption and risk of functional disability in an elderly Japanese population

T2 - The Hisayama Study

AU - Yoshida, Daigo

AU - Ohara, Tomoyuki

AU - Hata, Jun

AU - Shibata, Mao

AU - Hirakawa, Yoichiro

AU - Honda, Takanori

AU - Uchida, Kazuhiro

AU - Takasugi, Satoshi

AU - Kitazono, Takanari

AU - Kiyohara, Yutaka

AU - Ninomiya, Toshiharu

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Background: Little is known about the association between dairy intake and risk of functional disability in the elderly. Objectives: We examined the influence of dairy intake on the development of declining functional capacity and activities of daily living (ADL) in a prospective cohort study of an elderly population. Methods: A total of 859 community-dwelling Japanese residents, aged ?65 y without functional disability, were followed up for 7 y. Functional capacity impairment was defined as a TokyoMetropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence score of ≥12, and ADL disability was defined as a Barthel Index score of ≥95. Dairy intake was evaluated using a 150-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, grouped into quartiles. The RR of dairy intake on incident functional disabilitywas computed using a Poisson regression model. Results: The multivariable-Adjusted RR of impaired functional capacity decreased significantly with increasing dairy intake levels (RR [95% CI]: quartile 1, 1.00 [reference]; quartile 2, 0.85 [0.71, 1.02]; quartile 3, 0.81 [0.68, 0.98]; and quartile 4, 0.74 [0.61, 0.90]; P-Trend = 0.001). Regarding the three subscales of functional capacity, the inverse association between dairy intake and risk for impairment of intellectual activity and social role remained significant (P-Trend = 0.0009 and 0.02, respectively), but such an association was not observed for instrumental ADL. The multivariable-Adjusted risk of ADL disability also decreased weakly but significantly with elevating dairy intake (P-Trend=0.04). A similar association was seen for severity of functional disability (P-Trend = 0.002). However, the magnitude of these associations was attenuated after further adjustment for protein intake. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that higher dairy intake is associated with a lower risk of functional disability and its progression in the elderly, probably via an increase in protein intake.

AB - Background: Little is known about the association between dairy intake and risk of functional disability in the elderly. Objectives: We examined the influence of dairy intake on the development of declining functional capacity and activities of daily living (ADL) in a prospective cohort study of an elderly population. Methods: A total of 859 community-dwelling Japanese residents, aged ?65 y without functional disability, were followed up for 7 y. Functional capacity impairment was defined as a TokyoMetropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence score of ≥12, and ADL disability was defined as a Barthel Index score of ≥95. Dairy intake was evaluated using a 150-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, grouped into quartiles. The RR of dairy intake on incident functional disabilitywas computed using a Poisson regression model. Results: The multivariable-Adjusted RR of impaired functional capacity decreased significantly with increasing dairy intake levels (RR [95% CI]: quartile 1, 1.00 [reference]; quartile 2, 0.85 [0.71, 1.02]; quartile 3, 0.81 [0.68, 0.98]; and quartile 4, 0.74 [0.61, 0.90]; P-Trend = 0.001). Regarding the three subscales of functional capacity, the inverse association between dairy intake and risk for impairment of intellectual activity and social role remained significant (P-Trend = 0.0009 and 0.02, respectively), but such an association was not observed for instrumental ADL. The multivariable-Adjusted risk of ADL disability also decreased weakly but significantly with elevating dairy intake (P-Trend=0.04). A similar association was seen for severity of functional disability (P-Trend = 0.002). However, the magnitude of these associations was attenuated after further adjustment for protein intake. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that higher dairy intake is associated with a lower risk of functional disability and its progression in the elderly, probably via an increase in protein intake.

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U2 - 10.1093/ajcn/nqz040

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