Developing a new low-velocity collision model to be used in debris generation and propagation codes

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kyushu University has performed some low-velocity impact experiments to understand the dispersion properties of fragments newly created by low-velocity collision possible in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Those experimental data are utilized to establish a mathematical prediction model to be used in debris generation and propagation codes. To exam the applicability of the NASA standard breakup model, which has been developed based on hypervelocity impact experiments, to low-velocity collisions possible in geosynchronous Earth orbit, the author re-analyzed those experimental data based on the method used in the NASA standard breakup model and compared them with the NASA standard breakup model. The comparison indicates that the NASA standard breakup model can be applied to low-velocity collision with some modifications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-888
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
Volume117
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2004
Event10th International Conference of Pacific Basin Societies, ISCOPS - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: Dec 10 2003Dec 12 2003

Fingerprint

Debris
collision
NASA
Orbits
Earth (planet)
experiment
Experiments
code
prediction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Developing a new low-velocity collision model to be used in debris generation and propagation codes. / Hanada, Toshiya.

In: Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, Vol. 117, 01.12.2004, p. 875-888.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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