Development of esophageal cancer after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices

Three case reports

M. Ohta, H. Kuwano, Makoto Hashizume, T. Sonoda, M. Tomikawa, H. Higashi, S. Ohno, M. Watanabe, K. Sugimachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report here three cases of squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus following endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices. All three patients were men and cigarette smokers, with a mean age of 58.3 ± 5.0 years. Hepatitis B and C virus infection tests were negative, and alcoholic cirrhosis was present in each patient. The interval between sclerotherapy and the development of carcinoma was 9, 10, and 33 months, in the respective cases. The sclerosant used was 5% ethanolamine oleate with a mean total volume of 51.0 ± 18.9 ml. While we have no evidence of a direct relationship between sclerotherapy and esophageal cancer, in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who have risk factors for esophageal cancer there may be an acceleration of the potential malignancy, as a result of the chronic inflammation related to sclerotherapy. Such patients should be closely followed, using endoscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-458
Number of pages4
JournalEndoscopy
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1995

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Sclerotherapy
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Esophageal Neoplasms
Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis
Injections
Sclerosing Solutions
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B virus
Tobacco Products
Hepacivirus
Esophagus
Endoscopy
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Inflammation
Carcinoma
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Ohta, M., Kuwano, H., Hashizume, M., Sonoda, T., Tomikawa, M., Higashi, H., ... Sugimachi, K. (1995). Development of esophageal cancer after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices: Three case reports. Endoscopy, 27(6), 455-458. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-1005742

Development of esophageal cancer after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices : Three case reports. / Ohta, M.; Kuwano, H.; Hashizume, Makoto; Sonoda, T.; Tomikawa, M.; Higashi, H.; Ohno, S.; Watanabe, M.; Sugimachi, K.

In: Endoscopy, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.01.1995, p. 455-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohta, M, Kuwano, H, Hashizume, M, Sonoda, T, Tomikawa, M, Higashi, H, Ohno, S, Watanabe, M & Sugimachi, K 1995, 'Development of esophageal cancer after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices: Three case reports', Endoscopy, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 455-458. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-1005742
Ohta, M. ; Kuwano, H. ; Hashizume, Makoto ; Sonoda, T. ; Tomikawa, M. ; Higashi, H. ; Ohno, S. ; Watanabe, M. ; Sugimachi, K. / Development of esophageal cancer after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices : Three case reports. In: Endoscopy. 1995 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 455-458.
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