Development of high-resolution 4D in vivo-CT for visualization of cardiac and respiratory deformations of small animals

Toshihiro Sera, Hideo Yokota, Kazuhiro Fujisaki, Kazuaki Fukasaku, Hiroyuki Tachibana, Kentaro Uesugi, Naoto Yagi, Ryutaro Himeno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interest in small animal models of human diseases has generated a need to design a computed tomography (CT) system that operates at a microscopic level. It is particularly important to be able to visualize the dramatic rhythmical motion of organs such as the heart and lungs. In order to evaluate the motion of the heart and lungs of small animals (rats and mice), we developed in the present study a high-resolution 4D in vivo-CT system for small animals that uses synchrotron radiation. To reduce motion artifacts and the radiation dose, the projections were synchronized with airway pressure, the ECG, the x-ray shutter and the CCD shutter. For cardiovascular imaging, a blood pool contrast agent was injected and the data sets were acquired at several ECG points during the end-expiratory phase. For imaging of the lungs, the data sets were acquired at several airway pressures during diastole. The dynamic motion of the cardiovascular system (the ventricles and coronary arteries) and small airways (diameter > 250 μm of rats and 125 μm of mice) was visualized. This high-resolution imaging tool may be very useful for the development of novel drugs in murine models, in addition to its use in the study of cardiovascular and respiratory physiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4285-4301
Number of pages17
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume53
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 21 2008
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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