Dietary effects of conjugated docosahexaenoic acid on N-methyl-N- nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats

Naoyuki Danbara, Norihisa Uehara, Nobuaki Shikata, Hideho Takada, Takahiko Hada, Airo Tsubura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dietary effects of conjugated docosahexaenoic acid (CDHA) were examined in an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis model. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 50 mg/kg MNU intraperitoneally at 49 days of age. A powdered AIN-76A diet containing 0, 0.2 or 1.0% CDHA was fed to the rats from 21 to 49 days of age (before MNU; pre-initiation phase) or from 49 days to 40 weeks of age (after MNU; post-initiation phase). Rats were sacrificed when their largest mammary tumor was ≥1 cm in size or when they reached 40 weeks of age. All histologically detected mammary carcinomas were evaluated. In rats that received CDHA after MNU, development of mammary carcinoma ≥1 cm was inhibited, and there was a significant decrease in the final mammary cancer incidence and multiplicity, compared with rats that did not receive CDHA. Consumption of the 0.2% CDHA diet after MNU significantly prolonged latency. Suppression of mammary cancer yield by consumption of a CDHA diet after MNU administration was not dose-dependent. In rats that received CDHA before MNU, suppression of mammary cancer was not observed. These results indicate that CDHA administration in the post-initiation period suppressed mammary carcinogenesis, whereas CDHA administration in the pre-initiation period was ineffective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1085
Number of pages7
JournalOncology reports
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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