Dietary fat intake and risk of Parkinson's disease: A case-control study in Japan

Yoshihiro Miyake, Satoshi Sasaki, Keiko Tanaka, Wakaba Fukushima, Chikako Kiyohara, Yoshio Tsuboi, Tatsuo Yamada, Tomoko Oeda, Takami Miki, Nobutoshi Kawamura, Nobutaka Sakae, Hidenao Fukuyama, Yoshio Hirota, Masaki Nagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present case-control study examined the relationship between dietary intake of individual fatty acids and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Japan. Included were 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD. Controls were 368 inpatients and outpatients without a neurodegenerative disease. Information on dietary factors was collected using a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire. Compared with arachidonic acid intake in the first quartile, consumption of that in the fourth quartile was significantly related to an increased risk of PD: the adjusted odds ratio between extreme quartiles was 2.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.21-3.64, P for trend = 0.008). Cholesterol intake was also significantly positively associated with the risk of PD: the adjusted odds ratio between extreme quartiles was 1.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-3.05, P for trend = 0.01). Consumption of total fat, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and linoleic acid and the ratio of n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake were not associated with PD. Higher consumption of arachidonic acid and cholesterol may be related to an increased risk of PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume288
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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