Dietary patterns and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Japanese population

The Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study

the Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dietary factors are major regulators of immune function. As systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder, dietary factors are probably associated with SLE risk. However, there are very limited studies on the association between SLE risk and diet. Methods: Factor analysis of 30 food items was performed to identify dietary patterns in 125 female SLE patients and 344 female controls. Dietary information was obtained by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustments for several covariates. Results: We identified three dietary patterns: vegetable, meat and dairy product patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, the dairy product pattern was significantly associated with an increased risk of SLE. Adjusted ORs (95% CI) for SLE in the first, second, third and fourth quartiles of the dairy product pattern were 1.00 (reference), 1.76 (0.89 - 3.54), 2.25 (1.15 - 4.43) and 1.97 (0.98 - 3.95), respectively (Ptrend = 0.045). The other two dietary patterns were not associated with SLE risk. Conclusion: The dairy product pattern may be associated with an increased risk of SLE. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the findings suggested in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-115
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume22
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Dairy Products
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Food
Meat Products
Statistical Factor Analysis
Logistic Models
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dietary patterns and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Japanese population : The Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study. / the Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study Group.

In: International Medical Journal, Vol. 22, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 110-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d87cd696129e4419bfd9f00d12e30648,
title = "Dietary patterns and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Japanese population: The Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study",
abstract = "Background: Dietary factors are major regulators of immune function. As systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder, dietary factors are probably associated with SLE risk. However, there are very limited studies on the association between SLE risk and diet. Methods: Factor analysis of 30 food items was performed to identify dietary patterns in 125 female SLE patients and 344 female controls. Dietary information was obtained by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratios (ORs) and their 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustments for several covariates. Results: We identified three dietary patterns: vegetable, meat and dairy product patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, the dairy product pattern was significantly associated with an increased risk of SLE. Adjusted ORs (95{\%} CI) for SLE in the first, second, third and fourth quartiles of the dairy product pattern were 1.00 (reference), 1.76 (0.89 - 3.54), 2.25 (1.15 - 4.43) and 1.97 (0.98 - 3.95), respectively (Ptrend = 0.045). The other two dietary patterns were not associated with SLE risk. Conclusion: The dairy product pattern may be associated with an increased risk of SLE. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the findings suggested in this study.",
author = "{the Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study Group} and Chikako Kiyohara and Masakazu Washio and Takahiko Horiuchi and Hiroki Takahashi and Yoshifumi Tada and Gen Kobashi and Toyoko Asami and Saburo Ide and Tatsuya Atsumi and Hiroko Kodama and Koichi Akashi and Mine Harada and Hiroshi Tsukamoto and Takao Hotokebuchi and Kohei Nagasawa and Osamu Ushiyama and Mitsuru Mori and Asae Oura and Yasuhisa Sinomura and Hiromu Suzuki and Motohisa Yamamoto and Takashi Abe and Hisato Tanaka and Shinsuke Yasuda and Norihiko Nogami and Kazushi Okamoto and Naomasa Sakamoto and Satoshi Sasaki and Yoshihiro Miyake and Tetsuji Yokoyama and Yutaka Inaba and Masaki Nagai",
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T1 - Dietary patterns and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Japanese population

T2 - The Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study

AU - the Kyushu Sapporo SLE (KYSS) Study Group

AU - Kiyohara, Chikako

AU - Washio, Masakazu

AU - Horiuchi, Takahiko

AU - Takahashi, Hiroki

AU - Tada, Yoshifumi

AU - Kobashi, Gen

AU - Asami, Toyoko

AU - Ide, Saburo

AU - Atsumi, Tatsuya

AU - Kodama, Hiroko

AU - Akashi, Koichi

AU - Harada, Mine

AU - Tsukamoto, Hiroshi

AU - Hotokebuchi, Takao

AU - Nagasawa, Kohei

AU - Ushiyama, Osamu

AU - Mori, Mitsuru

AU - Oura, Asae

AU - Sinomura, Yasuhisa

AU - Suzuki, Hiromu

AU - Yamamoto, Motohisa

AU - Abe, Takashi

AU - Tanaka, Hisato

AU - Yasuda, Shinsuke

AU - Nogami, Norihiko

AU - Okamoto, Kazushi

AU - Sakamoto, Naomasa

AU - Sasaki, Satoshi

AU - Miyake, Yoshihiro

AU - Yokoyama, Tetsuji

AU - Inaba, Yutaka

AU - Nagai, Masaki

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: Dietary factors are major regulators of immune function. As systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder, dietary factors are probably associated with SLE risk. However, there are very limited studies on the association between SLE risk and diet. Methods: Factor analysis of 30 food items was performed to identify dietary patterns in 125 female SLE patients and 344 female controls. Dietary information was obtained by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustments for several covariates. Results: We identified three dietary patterns: vegetable, meat and dairy product patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, the dairy product pattern was significantly associated with an increased risk of SLE. Adjusted ORs (95% CI) for SLE in the first, second, third and fourth quartiles of the dairy product pattern were 1.00 (reference), 1.76 (0.89 - 3.54), 2.25 (1.15 - 4.43) and 1.97 (0.98 - 3.95), respectively (Ptrend = 0.045). The other two dietary patterns were not associated with SLE risk. Conclusion: The dairy product pattern may be associated with an increased risk of SLE. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the findings suggested in this study.

AB - Background: Dietary factors are major regulators of immune function. As systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder, dietary factors are probably associated with SLE risk. However, there are very limited studies on the association between SLE risk and diet. Methods: Factor analysis of 30 food items was performed to identify dietary patterns in 125 female SLE patients and 344 female controls. Dietary information was obtained by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustments for several covariates. Results: We identified three dietary patterns: vegetable, meat and dairy product patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, the dairy product pattern was significantly associated with an increased risk of SLE. Adjusted ORs (95% CI) for SLE in the first, second, third and fourth quartiles of the dairy product pattern were 1.00 (reference), 1.76 (0.89 - 3.54), 2.25 (1.15 - 4.43) and 1.97 (0.98 - 3.95), respectively (Ptrend = 0.045). The other two dietary patterns were not associated with SLE risk. Conclusion: The dairy product pattern may be associated with an increased risk of SLE. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the findings suggested in this study.

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M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 110

EP - 115

JO - International Medical Journal

JF - International Medical Journal

SN - 1341-2051

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