Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier

Tomotaka Matsumoto, Akiko A. Yasumoto, Kozue Nitta, Tetsukazu Yahara, Hidenori Tachida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although many theoretical studies have reported strong effects of different flowering times on reproductive isolation, such studies have all focused on the different flowering time within a season, and the subsequently developed models are difficult to apply to the cases of diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering species pairs. The different flowering times within a day differ from those within a season because of the simultaneous opening and closing of the flowers for each species and the carry-over of the pollen from early to later times. In this study, we consider pollinator-mediated, diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering plants and build a new model to study the effects of the different flowering times within a day on reproductive isolation. We assume two loci, each with two alleles, which determine the opening and closing times of flowers, respectively. We numerically calculate the changes in the frequencies of the gametes in a model incorporating the reductions in hybrid viability, flowering costs, recombination rate and degree of dominance at each locus. We found that the early-opening flowers had a much higher fitness than the late-opening flowers and that the maintenance of the two species was difficult even if their flowering times were not overlapping. Therefore, some other mechanisms, such as pollinator preference, may be required to explain the coexistence of closely related diurnal and nocturnal flowers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-167
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume317
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Flowering
flowering
flowers
Reproductive Isolation
reproductive isolation
pollinators
Isolation
Locus
loci
Pollen
Costs
Germ Cells
Genetic Recombination
dominance (genetics)
Viability
Angiospermae
Recombination
germ cells
Coexistence
Fitness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier. / Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Yasumoto, Akiko A.; Nitta, Kozue; Yahara, Tetsukazu; Tachida, Hidenori.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 317, 01.01.2013, p. 161-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumoto, Tomotaka ; Yasumoto, Akiko A. ; Nitta, Kozue ; Yahara, Tetsukazu ; Tachida, Hidenori. / Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 317. pp. 161-167.
@article{d460b6ad96564caf97a5e15d14c9382b,
title = "Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier",
abstract = "Although many theoretical studies have reported strong effects of different flowering times on reproductive isolation, such studies have all focused on the different flowering time within a season, and the subsequently developed models are difficult to apply to the cases of diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering species pairs. The different flowering times within a day differ from those within a season because of the simultaneous opening and closing of the flowers for each species and the carry-over of the pollen from early to later times. In this study, we consider pollinator-mediated, diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering plants and build a new model to study the effects of the different flowering times within a day on reproductive isolation. We assume two loci, each with two alleles, which determine the opening and closing times of flowers, respectively. We numerically calculate the changes in the frequencies of the gametes in a model incorporating the reductions in hybrid viability, flowering costs, recombination rate and degree of dominance at each locus. We found that the early-opening flowers had a much higher fitness than the late-opening flowers and that the maintenance of the two species was difficult even if their flowering times were not overlapping. Therefore, some other mechanisms, such as pollinator preference, may be required to explain the coexistence of closely related diurnal and nocturnal flowers.",
author = "Tomotaka Matsumoto and Yasumoto, {Akiko A.} and Kozue Nitta and Tetsukazu Yahara and Hidenori Tachida",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.10.001",
language = "English",
volume = "317",
pages = "161--167",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier

AU - Matsumoto, Tomotaka

AU - Yasumoto, Akiko A.

AU - Nitta, Kozue

AU - Yahara, Tetsukazu

AU - Tachida, Hidenori

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Although many theoretical studies have reported strong effects of different flowering times on reproductive isolation, such studies have all focused on the different flowering time within a season, and the subsequently developed models are difficult to apply to the cases of diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering species pairs. The different flowering times within a day differ from those within a season because of the simultaneous opening and closing of the flowers for each species and the carry-over of the pollen from early to later times. In this study, we consider pollinator-mediated, diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering plants and build a new model to study the effects of the different flowering times within a day on reproductive isolation. We assume two loci, each with two alleles, which determine the opening and closing times of flowers, respectively. We numerically calculate the changes in the frequencies of the gametes in a model incorporating the reductions in hybrid viability, flowering costs, recombination rate and degree of dominance at each locus. We found that the early-opening flowers had a much higher fitness than the late-opening flowers and that the maintenance of the two species was difficult even if their flowering times were not overlapping. Therefore, some other mechanisms, such as pollinator preference, may be required to explain the coexistence of closely related diurnal and nocturnal flowers.

AB - Although many theoretical studies have reported strong effects of different flowering times on reproductive isolation, such studies have all focused on the different flowering time within a season, and the subsequently developed models are difficult to apply to the cases of diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering species pairs. The different flowering times within a day differ from those within a season because of the simultaneous opening and closing of the flowers for each species and the carry-over of the pollen from early to later times. In this study, we consider pollinator-mediated, diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering plants and build a new model to study the effects of the different flowering times within a day on reproductive isolation. We assume two loci, each with two alleles, which determine the opening and closing times of flowers, respectively. We numerically calculate the changes in the frequencies of the gametes in a model incorporating the reductions in hybrid viability, flowering costs, recombination rate and degree of dominance at each locus. We found that the early-opening flowers had a much higher fitness than the late-opening flowers and that the maintenance of the two species was difficult even if their flowering times were not overlapping. Therefore, some other mechanisms, such as pollinator preference, may be required to explain the coexistence of closely related diurnal and nocturnal flowers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868248465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868248465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.10.001

M3 - Article

VL - 317

SP - 161

EP - 167

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

ER -