Differences in the acidic sensitivity of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) between chickens and mice

Ruojun Liang, Yuko Kawabata, Fuminori Kawabata, Shotaro Nishimura, Shoji Tabata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chickens, one of the most important industrial animals, are a biological animal model. Here we focused on the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) to understand the pain system for acidic stimuli in chickens compared with mice. By using a whole-cell patch clamp system, we confirmed that acidic stimuli activate both chicken TRPV1 (cTRPV1) and mouse TRPV1 (mTRPV1), but the peak current of cTRPV1 is lower than that of mTRPV1, and it is difficult to desensitize cTRPV1 with an acidic stimulus compared to mTRPV1. Since the C-terminal of the calmodulin (CaM) binding site in TRPV1 was reported as one of the important structures for TRPV1 desensitization, we made chimeric cTRPV1 in which the CaM binding site of chicken is changed to that of mouse (cTRPV1-mCaM). We also compared the acidic responses of native chicken dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells with that of mouse DRG cells. The TRPV1-mCaM results showed that the desensitization of mutant cTRPV1 was similar to that of mTRPV1, and that the basal activities of mutant cTRPV1 were significantly higher than those of cTRPV1. It was also difficult to desensitize the chicken DRG cells with an acidic stimulus, unlike the mouse DRG cells. These results suggest that there are differences in the pain transduction systems for acidic stimuli between chickens and mice that are caused by the dysfunction of the C-terminal CaM biding site of cTRPV1. These results imply that chickens repeatedly feel weak pain from an acidic stimulus, without desensitization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-393
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume515
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 23 2019

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Chickens
Calmodulin
Spinal Ganglia
Animals
Binding Sites
Clamping devices
vanilloid receptor subtype 1
Pain
Biological Models
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Differences in the acidic sensitivity of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) between chickens and mice. / Liang, Ruojun; Kawabata, Yuko; Kawabata, Fuminori; Nishimura, Shotaro; Tabata, Shoji.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 515, No. 2, 23.07.2019, p. 386-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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