Different physiological and subjective responses to the hyperthermia between young and older adults: Basic study for thermal therapy in cardiovascular diseases

Hiroyuki Sawatari, Akiko Chishaki, Mami Miyazono, Nobuko Hashiguchi, Yukari Maeno, Hiroaki Chishaki, Yutaka Tochihara

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Thermal therapy has been used as adjuvant therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about responses to thermal stress in older adults. We examined the effects of thermal stress in younger and older healthy Japanese individuals. Methods: The study included 12 young (mean age, 22 years) and 12 older (mean age, 68 years) healthy adults and was performed under strict temperature and humidity control to minimize confounding. Participants lay supine throughout three consecutive 30-minute phases: Phase I (heating at 70°C in a dome-shaped sauna), Phase II (insulation in the sauna), and Phase III (cool down). Physiological parameters and subjective thermal sensations were compared within and between two age groups. Results: Mean skin temperature increased significantly in both age groups (Phase I) and after the first 10 minutes was higher among older adults (by 6.8°C vs 6.0°C among younger; p <. 01). Mean rectal temperature increased by 0.6°C in both groups (Phase II). Mean heart rate increased significantly in both age groups (Phase II) and was higher among younger adults (by 21.4 vs 11.3 beats/min among older adults; p <. 05). Both systolic (by 15.1 mmHg) and diastolic (by 10.5 mmHg) blood pressure dropped significantly among older adults (Phase I), returning to baseline in Phase III; no changes were noted among those younger. There was no between-group difference in fluid loss or thermal sensations. Conclusions: Compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to drop blood pressure in response to thermal stress but had similar fluid loss and subjective responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-916
Number of pages5
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume70
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 11 2014

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Young Adult
Fever
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hot Temperature
Steam Bath
Age Groups
Therapeutics
Blood Pressure
Temperature
Skin Temperature
Humidity
Heating
Heart Rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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title = "Different physiological and subjective responses to the hyperthermia between young and older adults: Basic study for thermal therapy in cardiovascular diseases",
abstract = "Background. Thermal therapy has been used as adjuvant therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about responses to thermal stress in older adults. We examined the effects of thermal stress in younger and older healthy Japanese individuals. Methods: The study included 12 young (mean age, 22 years) and 12 older (mean age, 68 years) healthy adults and was performed under strict temperature and humidity control to minimize confounding. Participants lay supine throughout three consecutive 30-minute phases: Phase I (heating at 70°C in a dome-shaped sauna), Phase II (insulation in the sauna), and Phase III (cool down). Physiological parameters and subjective thermal sensations were compared within and between two age groups. Results: Mean skin temperature increased significantly in both age groups (Phase I) and after the first 10 minutes was higher among older adults (by 6.8°C vs 6.0°C among younger; p <. 01). Mean rectal temperature increased by 0.6°C in both groups (Phase II). Mean heart rate increased significantly in both age groups (Phase II) and was higher among younger adults (by 21.4 vs 11.3 beats/min among older adults; p <. 05). Both systolic (by 15.1 mmHg) and diastolic (by 10.5 mmHg) blood pressure dropped significantly among older adults (Phase I), returning to baseline in Phase III; no changes were noted among those younger. There was no between-group difference in fluid loss or thermal sensations. Conclusions: Compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to drop blood pressure in response to thermal stress but had similar fluid loss and subjective responses.",
author = "Hiroyuki Sawatari and Akiko Chishaki and Mami Miyazono and Nobuko Hashiguchi and Yukari Maeno and Hiroaki Chishaki and Yutaka Tochihara",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Different physiological and subjective responses to the hyperthermia between young and older adults

T2 - Basic study for thermal therapy in cardiovascular diseases

AU - Sawatari, Hiroyuki

AU - Chishaki, Akiko

AU - Miyazono, Mami

AU - Hashiguchi, Nobuko

AU - Maeno, Yukari

AU - Chishaki, Hiroaki

AU - Tochihara, Yutaka

PY - 2014/1/11

Y1 - 2014/1/11

N2 - Background. Thermal therapy has been used as adjuvant therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about responses to thermal stress in older adults. We examined the effects of thermal stress in younger and older healthy Japanese individuals. Methods: The study included 12 young (mean age, 22 years) and 12 older (mean age, 68 years) healthy adults and was performed under strict temperature and humidity control to minimize confounding. Participants lay supine throughout three consecutive 30-minute phases: Phase I (heating at 70°C in a dome-shaped sauna), Phase II (insulation in the sauna), and Phase III (cool down). Physiological parameters and subjective thermal sensations were compared within and between two age groups. Results: Mean skin temperature increased significantly in both age groups (Phase I) and after the first 10 minutes was higher among older adults (by 6.8°C vs 6.0°C among younger; p <. 01). Mean rectal temperature increased by 0.6°C in both groups (Phase II). Mean heart rate increased significantly in both age groups (Phase II) and was higher among younger adults (by 21.4 vs 11.3 beats/min among older adults; p <. 05). Both systolic (by 15.1 mmHg) and diastolic (by 10.5 mmHg) blood pressure dropped significantly among older adults (Phase I), returning to baseline in Phase III; no changes were noted among those younger. There was no between-group difference in fluid loss or thermal sensations. Conclusions: Compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to drop blood pressure in response to thermal stress but had similar fluid loss and subjective responses.

AB - Background. Thermal therapy has been used as adjuvant therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about responses to thermal stress in older adults. We examined the effects of thermal stress in younger and older healthy Japanese individuals. Methods: The study included 12 young (mean age, 22 years) and 12 older (mean age, 68 years) healthy adults and was performed under strict temperature and humidity control to minimize confounding. Participants lay supine throughout three consecutive 30-minute phases: Phase I (heating at 70°C in a dome-shaped sauna), Phase II (insulation in the sauna), and Phase III (cool down). Physiological parameters and subjective thermal sensations were compared within and between two age groups. Results: Mean skin temperature increased significantly in both age groups (Phase I) and after the first 10 minutes was higher among older adults (by 6.8°C vs 6.0°C among younger; p <. 01). Mean rectal temperature increased by 0.6°C in both groups (Phase II). Mean heart rate increased significantly in both age groups (Phase II) and was higher among younger adults (by 21.4 vs 11.3 beats/min among older adults; p <. 05). Both systolic (by 15.1 mmHg) and diastolic (by 10.5 mmHg) blood pressure dropped significantly among older adults (Phase I), returning to baseline in Phase III; no changes were noted among those younger. There was no between-group difference in fluid loss or thermal sensations. Conclusions: Compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to drop blood pressure in response to thermal stress but had similar fluid loss and subjective responses.

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U2 - 10.1093/gerona/glu224

DO - 10.1093/gerona/glu224

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JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

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