Diffusion tensor studies dissociated two fronto-temporal pathways in the human memory system

Emi Takahashi, Kenichi Oki, Dae Shik Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that multiple cortical areas are involved in memory encoding and retrieval. However, the underlying anatomical connections among these memory-related areas in humans remain elusive due to methodological limitations. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique based on detecting the diffusion of water molecules from magnetic resonance images. DTI allows non-invasive mapping of anatomical connections and gives a comprehensive picture of connectivity throughout the entire brain. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and DTI, we show that memory-related areas in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) each connect with memory-related areas in the left temporal cortex. This result suggests there are two pathways between prefrontal cortex and temporal cortex related to the human memory system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)827-838
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroImage
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2007

Fingerprint

Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Prefrontal Cortex
Temporal Lobe
Functional Neuroimaging
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Water
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Diffusion tensor studies dissociated two fronto-temporal pathways in the human memory system. / Takahashi, Emi; Oki, Kenichi; Kim, Dae Shik.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 34, No. 2, 15.01.2007, p. 827-838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, Emi ; Oki, Kenichi ; Kim, Dae Shik. / Diffusion tensor studies dissociated two fronto-temporal pathways in the human memory system. In: NeuroImage. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 827-838.
@article{f59f5e22dfef460c8920d6e170551f90,
title = "Diffusion tensor studies dissociated two fronto-temporal pathways in the human memory system",
abstract = "Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that multiple cortical areas are involved in memory encoding and retrieval. However, the underlying anatomical connections among these memory-related areas in humans remain elusive due to methodological limitations. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique based on detecting the diffusion of water molecules from magnetic resonance images. DTI allows non-invasive mapping of anatomical connections and gives a comprehensive picture of connectivity throughout the entire brain. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and DTI, we show that memory-related areas in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) each connect with memory-related areas in the left temporal cortex. This result suggests there are two pathways between prefrontal cortex and temporal cortex related to the human memory system.",
author = "Emi Takahashi and Kenichi Oki and Kim, {Dae Shik}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.10.009",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "827--838",
journal = "NeuroImage",
issn = "1053-8119",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diffusion tensor studies dissociated two fronto-temporal pathways in the human memory system

AU - Takahashi, Emi

AU - Oki, Kenichi

AU - Kim, Dae Shik

PY - 2007/1/15

Y1 - 2007/1/15

N2 - Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that multiple cortical areas are involved in memory encoding and retrieval. However, the underlying anatomical connections among these memory-related areas in humans remain elusive due to methodological limitations. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique based on detecting the diffusion of water molecules from magnetic resonance images. DTI allows non-invasive mapping of anatomical connections and gives a comprehensive picture of connectivity throughout the entire brain. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and DTI, we show that memory-related areas in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) each connect with memory-related areas in the left temporal cortex. This result suggests there are two pathways between prefrontal cortex and temporal cortex related to the human memory system.

AB - Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that multiple cortical areas are involved in memory encoding and retrieval. However, the underlying anatomical connections among these memory-related areas in humans remain elusive due to methodological limitations. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a technique based on detecting the diffusion of water molecules from magnetic resonance images. DTI allows non-invasive mapping of anatomical connections and gives a comprehensive picture of connectivity throughout the entire brain. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and DTI, we show that memory-related areas in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) each connect with memory-related areas in the left temporal cortex. This result suggests there are two pathways between prefrontal cortex and temporal cortex related to the human memory system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33751509418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33751509418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.10.009

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.10.009

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 827

EP - 838

JO - NeuroImage

JF - NeuroImage

SN - 1053-8119

IS - 2

ER -