Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan: A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging

Mamiko Inoue, Satoshi Fujii, Taisei Mikami, Tomoo Furumoto, Sanae Kaga, Hiroshi Komatsu, Kazutomo Goto, Kaoru Komuro, Satoshi Yamada, Hisao Onozuka, Akira Kitabatake, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. The efficacy of antihypertensive agents can vary in patients. Four to 8 weeks may be required before antihypertensive agents become fully effective. Predicting the efficacy can help agent selection and dose setting. This study determined whether nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of brachial arteries can predict the antihypertensive action of angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Methods. Untreated uncomplicated patients with essential hypertension, who gave informed consent, were studied (n = 20, mean age 55 years). Before antihypertensive treatment, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of the brachial arteries was measured using a novel method of 15 MHz high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging (Hitachi EUB8000). Diameter of the brachial artery at the end-systolic phase was measured before and after 0.3 mg nitroglycerin sublingual spray and percentage vasodilation (%D-N) was calculated. The reduction of mean blood pressure after nitroglycerin (%BP-N) was calculated. Valsartan monotherapy (40-80 mg/day) was administered for 3-6 months (mean 132 days). Reduction of mean blood pressure after valsartan monotherapy (%BP-V) was calculated. Results. Valsartan decreased systolic blood pressure from 138 ± 13 to 130 ± 17mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure from 83 ± 11 to 78 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.05). %D-N was correlated closely with %BP-V (r = -0.70, p < 0.001). %BP-N had no correlation with %BP-V (r = 0.13, p = 0.58). Conclusions. Direct vasodilatory action of nitroglycerin on vascular smooth muscle cells may predict the chronic antihypertensive effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiology
Volume47
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Valsartan
Brachial Artery
Nitroglycerin
Antihypertensive Agents
Dilatation
Ultrasonography
Blood Pressure
Vasodilation
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Informed Consent
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Smooth Muscle Myocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan : A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging. / Inoue, Mamiko; Fujii, Satoshi; Mikami, Taisei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kaga, Sanae; Komatsu, Hiroshi; Goto, Kazutomo; Komuro, Kaoru; Yamada, Satoshi; Onozuka, Hisao; Kitabatake, Akira; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki.

In: Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.12.2006, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inoue, M, Fujii, S, Mikami, T, Furumoto, T, Kaga, S, Komatsu, H, Goto, K, Komuro, K, Yamada, S, Onozuka, H, Kitabatake, A & Tsutsui, H 2006, 'Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan: A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging', Journal of Cardiology, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 9-14.
Inoue, Mamiko ; Fujii, Satoshi ; Mikami, Taisei ; Furumoto, Tomoo ; Kaga, Sanae ; Komatsu, Hiroshi ; Goto, Kazutomo ; Komuro, Kaoru ; Yamada, Satoshi ; Onozuka, Hisao ; Kitabatake, Akira ; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki. / Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan : A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging. In: Journal of Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 9-14.
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title = "Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan: A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging",
abstract = "Objectives. The efficacy of antihypertensive agents can vary in patients. Four to 8 weeks may be required before antihypertensive agents become fully effective. Predicting the efficacy can help agent selection and dose setting. This study determined whether nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of brachial arteries can predict the antihypertensive action of angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Methods. Untreated uncomplicated patients with essential hypertension, who gave informed consent, were studied (n = 20, mean age 55 years). Before antihypertensive treatment, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of the brachial arteries was measured using a novel method of 15 MHz high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging (Hitachi EUB8000). Diameter of the brachial artery at the end-systolic phase was measured before and after 0.3 mg nitroglycerin sublingual spray and percentage vasodilation ({\%}D-N) was calculated. The reduction of mean blood pressure after nitroglycerin ({\%}BP-N) was calculated. Valsartan monotherapy (40-80 mg/day) was administered for 3-6 months (mean 132 days). Reduction of mean blood pressure after valsartan monotherapy ({\%}BP-V) was calculated. Results. Valsartan decreased systolic blood pressure from 138 ± 13 to 130 ± 17mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure from 83 ± 11 to 78 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.05). {\%}D-N was correlated closely with {\%}BP-V (r = -0.70, p < 0.001). {\%}BP-N had no correlation with {\%}BP-V (r = 0.13, p = 0.58). Conclusions. Direct vasodilatory action of nitroglycerin on vascular smooth muscle cells may predict the chronic antihypertensive effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist.",
author = "Mamiko Inoue and Satoshi Fujii and Taisei Mikami and Tomoo Furumoto and Sanae Kaga and Hiroshi Komatsu and Kazutomo Goto and Kaoru Komuro and Satoshi Yamada and Hisao Onozuka and Akira Kitabatake and Hiroyuki Tsutsui",
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T1 - Dilation of the brachial artery in response to sublingual nitroglycerin can predict the antihypertensive effects of valsartan

T2 - A study using novel high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging

AU - Inoue, Mamiko

AU - Fujii, Satoshi

AU - Mikami, Taisei

AU - Furumoto, Tomoo

AU - Kaga, Sanae

AU - Komatsu, Hiroshi

AU - Goto, Kazutomo

AU - Komuro, Kaoru

AU - Yamada, Satoshi

AU - Onozuka, Hisao

AU - Kitabatake, Akira

AU - Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - Objectives. The efficacy of antihypertensive agents can vary in patients. Four to 8 weeks may be required before antihypertensive agents become fully effective. Predicting the efficacy can help agent selection and dose setting. This study determined whether nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of brachial arteries can predict the antihypertensive action of angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Methods. Untreated uncomplicated patients with essential hypertension, who gave informed consent, were studied (n = 20, mean age 55 years). Before antihypertensive treatment, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of the brachial arteries was measured using a novel method of 15 MHz high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging (Hitachi EUB8000). Diameter of the brachial artery at the end-systolic phase was measured before and after 0.3 mg nitroglycerin sublingual spray and percentage vasodilation (%D-N) was calculated. The reduction of mean blood pressure after nitroglycerin (%BP-N) was calculated. Valsartan monotherapy (40-80 mg/day) was administered for 3-6 months (mean 132 days). Reduction of mean blood pressure after valsartan monotherapy (%BP-V) was calculated. Results. Valsartan decreased systolic blood pressure from 138 ± 13 to 130 ± 17mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure from 83 ± 11 to 78 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.05). %D-N was correlated closely with %BP-V (r = -0.70, p < 0.001). %BP-N had no correlation with %BP-V (r = 0.13, p = 0.58). Conclusions. Direct vasodilatory action of nitroglycerin on vascular smooth muscle cells may predict the chronic antihypertensive effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

AB - Objectives. The efficacy of antihypertensive agents can vary in patients. Four to 8 weeks may be required before antihypertensive agents become fully effective. Predicting the efficacy can help agent selection and dose setting. This study determined whether nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of brachial arteries can predict the antihypertensive action of angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Methods. Untreated uncomplicated patients with essential hypertension, who gave informed consent, were studied (n = 20, mean age 55 years). Before antihypertensive treatment, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation of the brachial arteries was measured using a novel method of 15 MHz high-frequency high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging (Hitachi EUB8000). Diameter of the brachial artery at the end-systolic phase was measured before and after 0.3 mg nitroglycerin sublingual spray and percentage vasodilation (%D-N) was calculated. The reduction of mean blood pressure after nitroglycerin (%BP-N) was calculated. Valsartan monotherapy (40-80 mg/day) was administered for 3-6 months (mean 132 days). Reduction of mean blood pressure after valsartan monotherapy (%BP-V) was calculated. Results. Valsartan decreased systolic blood pressure from 138 ± 13 to 130 ± 17mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure from 83 ± 11 to 78 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.05). %D-N was correlated closely with %BP-V (r = -0.70, p < 0.001). %BP-N had no correlation with %BP-V (r = 0.13, p = 0.58). Conclusions. Direct vasodilatory action of nitroglycerin on vascular smooth muscle cells may predict the chronic antihypertensive effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

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