Directional bias of illusory stream caused by relative motion adaptation

Erika Tomimatsu, Hiroyuki Ito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Enigma is an op-art painting that elicits an illusion of rotational streaming motion. In the present study, we tested whether adaptation to various motion configurations that included relative motion components could be reflected in the directional bias of the illusory stream. First, participants viewed the center of a rotating Enigma stimulus for adaptation. There was no physical motion on the ring area. During the adaptation period, the illusory stream on the ring was mainly seen in the direction opposite to that of the physical rotation. After the physical rotation stopped, the illusory stream on the ring was mainly seen in the same direction as that of the preceding physical rotation. Moreover, adapting to strong relative motion induced a strong bias in the illusory motion direction in the subsequently presented static Enigma stimulus. The results suggest that relative motion detectors corresponding to the ring area may produce the illusory stream of Enigma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-43
Number of pages10
JournalVision Research
Volume124
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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Directional bias of illusory stream caused by relative motion adaptation. / Tomimatsu, Erika; Ito, Hiroyuki.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 124, 01.07.2016, p. 34-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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