Dislocation-obstacle interactions

Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling

Ian M. Robertson, A. Beaudoin, K. Al-Fadhalah, Li Chun-Ming, J. Robach, B. D. Wirth, A. Arsenlis, D. Ahn, Petros Athanasios Sofronis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Incorporating the interaction of dislocations with obstacles remains a challenge in the development of predictive large-scale plasticity models. The need is particularly important in the elastic-plastic transition region where these interactions can dominate the behavior. By combining post-mortem analysis with dynamic straining in the transmission electron microscope, the atomic processes governing glissile dislocation reactions and interactions with obstacles has been determined. This information has been incorporated at least phenomenologically in models to assess the macroscopic stress-strain response. Two examples will be presented to demonstrate the methodology. The first example considers the interaction of dislocations with small vacancy Frank loops and the formation of defect-free channels in copper, and the second with the influence of imperfect annealing twin boundaries on the macroscopic stress-strain response in silver. In both examples, the importance of grain and twin boundaries as dislocation sources will be demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-250
Number of pages6
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
Volume400-401
Issue number1-2 SUPPL.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 25 2005

Fingerprint

continuum modeling
Dislocations (crystals)
Silver
Vacancies
Plasticity
Copper
Electron microscopes
Experiments
interactions
Annealing
Plastics
Defects
plastic properties
plastics
grain boundaries
electron microscopes
silver
methodology
copper
annealing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Robertson, I. M., Beaudoin, A., Al-Fadhalah, K., Chun-Ming, L., Robach, J., Wirth, B. D., ... Sofronis, P. A. (2005). Dislocation-obstacle interactions: Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling. Materials Science and Engineering A, 400-401(1-2 SUPPL.), 245-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2005.04.002

Dislocation-obstacle interactions : Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling. / Robertson, Ian M.; Beaudoin, A.; Al-Fadhalah, K.; Chun-Ming, Li; Robach, J.; Wirth, B. D.; Arsenlis, A.; Ahn, D.; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 400-401, No. 1-2 SUPPL., 25.07.2005, p. 245-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robertson, IM, Beaudoin, A, Al-Fadhalah, K, Chun-Ming, L, Robach, J, Wirth, BD, Arsenlis, A, Ahn, D & Sofronis, PA 2005, 'Dislocation-obstacle interactions: Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling', Materials Science and Engineering A, vol. 400-401, no. 1-2 SUPPL., pp. 245-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2005.04.002
Robertson IM, Beaudoin A, Al-Fadhalah K, Chun-Ming L, Robach J, Wirth BD et al. Dislocation-obstacle interactions: Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling. Materials Science and Engineering A. 2005 Jul 25;400-401(1-2 SUPPL.):245-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2005.04.002
Robertson, Ian M. ; Beaudoin, A. ; Al-Fadhalah, K. ; Chun-Ming, Li ; Robach, J. ; Wirth, B. D. ; Arsenlis, A. ; Ahn, D. ; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios. / Dislocation-obstacle interactions : Dynamic experiments to continuum modeling. In: Materials Science and Engineering A. 2005 ; Vol. 400-401, No. 1-2 SUPPL. pp. 245-250.
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