Disruption, disaster and transition: Analysis of electricity usage in Japan from 2005 to 2016

Kelly Maree D’Alessandro, Andrew Chapman, Paul Dargusch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research analyses changes to electricity generation and demand in Japan following both the Global Financial Crisis and Disasters of March 2011. Monthly electricity data for all regions of Japan from April 2005 to March 2016 were reviewed to identify differences in disruptionresponse between categories of electricity users. We apply inferential statistics to identify underlying trends, which are dominated by differences in user scale response. Higher capacity users reduced demand in response to the Global Financial Crisis, whereas smaller domestic scale users reduced electricity demand after the Disaster. Analysis reveals that regions within the 50Hz grid that were directly impacted by the Fukushima event and resulting load restrictions showed a statistically significant sustained reduction in monthly electricity demand post-disaster. However, Kansai and Shikoku, regions that are both outside the area directly impacted by the Fukushima event, also showed the same sorts of sustained significant reductions. By considering two disruptions to the same sociotechnical system, we can draw conclusions that add to the discourse of electricity use behaviors, which informs both disaster response planning and policy for the broader issues of electricity demand reduction for climate stabilisation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-160
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

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