Do interventions to prevent lifestyle-related diseases reduce healthcare expenditures? A randomized controlled clinical trial

Akira Babazono, Kazuaki Kuwabara, Akihito Hagiihara, Jun Nagano, Reiko Ishihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In 2008, the Japanese government implemented a program of health lifestyle interventions to reduce health care expenditure. This study evaluated whether these interventions decreased health care expenditures. Methods: The study enrolled 99 participants insured by Japanese National Health Insurance, who, in our previous study conducted in 2004, were allocated by random sampling into an intervention group (50 participants) and a control group (49 participants). In the intervention group, we used a health support method that facilitated the attainment of goals established by each participant. The control group received instruction in exercise, as well as health support using publically available media. Although 3 participants in the intervention group and 9 participants in the control group did not participate in a follow-up health examination 1 year after the intervention, the health care expenditures of all initial participants were assessed. Expenditures before and after the intervention were compared within and between groups. Data on health care expenditures were obtained from inpatient, outpatient, pharmacy, and dental health insurance claims. Results: After the intervention, the pharmacy and dental expenditures were significantly higher in the intervention group, while the pharmacy expenditure was significantly higher in the control group. However, there was no significant difference in any medical expenditure item between the intervention and control groups before or after the intervention. Conclusions: No significant differences were observed in short-term medical expenses for any medical expenditure item after a lifestyle intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-80
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of epidemiology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 21 2011

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Health Expenditures
Life Style
Randomized Controlled Trials
Delivery of Health Care
Control Groups
Health
Dental Insurance
National Health Programs
Health Insurance
Inpatients
Tooth
Outpatients
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Do interventions to prevent lifestyle-related diseases reduce healthcare expenditures? A randomized controlled clinical trial. / Babazono, Akira; Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Hagiihara, Akihito; Nagano, Jun; Ishihara, Reiko.

In: Journal of epidemiology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 21.01.2011, p. 75-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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