Dried watermelon rind mash diet increases plasma l -citrulline level in chicks

Linh T.N. Nguyen, Guofeng Han, Hui Yang, Hiromi Ikeda, Hatem M. Eltahan, Vishwajit Surchowdhury, Mitsuhiro Furuse

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Heat stress is an increasing concern in poultry industry as it can cause a rise in the body temperature of chickens. Recently, we reported that L-citrulline (L-Cit) isa potential hypothermic agent that could improve thermotolerance in chicks. However, synthetic L-Cit has not yet been approved for inclusion in animal diets. L-Cit was first isolated from watermelon. Watermelon rind (WR), an agricultural waste product, contains more L-Cit than the flesh of the fruit. In the current study, the chemical composition and L-Cit content of WR dried powder (WRP) were determined. WRP was mixed with water at a ratio of 4:5 (wt/v) to make WRP mash, and then mixed with a commercial starter diet to prepare a 9% WRP mash diet. The WRP mash diet was fed to 3-to 15-day-old chicks and daily food intake, body weight, and changesin rectal temperature were measured. At the end of the experiment, blood wascollected from the chicksto analyze plasma L-Cit and other free amino acids. The chemical analysis of WRP revealed a variety of com-ponentsincluding 19.1% crude protein. L-Cit wasthe most abundant free amino acid in WRP (3.18 mg/g). Chronic supplementation of the WRP mash diet significantly increased compensatory food intake, plasma L-Cit, L-ornithine, and L-tyrosine in chicks. WRP mash diet did not affect the body temperature of the chicks. In conclusion, WRP mash diet supplementation increased plasma L-Cit concentration in chicks. The increase in plasma L-Cit concentrations suggest that WR could be used as a natural source of L-Cit in chicks to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-70
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Poultry Science
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

citrulline
mash
watermelons
powders
chicks
diet
free amino acids
body temperature
heat stress
food intake
agricultural wastes
starter diets
ornithine
poultry industry
heat tolerance
chemical analysis
tyrosine
crude protein
chemical composition
adverse effects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Dried watermelon rind mash diet increases plasma l -citrulline level in chicks . / Nguyen, Linh T.N.; Han, Guofeng; Yang, Hui; Ikeda, Hiromi; Eltahan, Hatem M.; Surchowdhury, Vishwajit; Furuse, Mitsuhiro.

In: Journal of Poultry Science, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Nguyen, Linh T.N. ; Han, Guofeng ; Yang, Hui ; Ikeda, Hiromi ; Eltahan, Hatem M. ; Surchowdhury, Vishwajit ; Furuse, Mitsuhiro. / Dried watermelon rind mash diet increases plasma l -citrulline level in chicks In: Journal of Poultry Science. 2019 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 65-70.
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abstract = "Heat stress is an increasing concern in poultry industry as it can cause a rise in the body temperature of chickens. Recently, we reported that L-citrulline (L-Cit) isa potential hypothermic agent that could improve thermotolerance in chicks. However, synthetic L-Cit has not yet been approved for inclusion in animal diets. L-Cit was first isolated from watermelon. Watermelon rind (WR), an agricultural waste product, contains more L-Cit than the flesh of the fruit. In the current study, the chemical composition and L-Cit content of WR dried powder (WRP) were determined. WRP was mixed with water at a ratio of 4:5 (wt/v) to make WRP mash, and then mixed with a commercial starter diet to prepare a 9{\%} WRP mash diet. The WRP mash diet was fed to 3-to 15-day-old chicks and daily food intake, body weight, and changesin rectal temperature were measured. At the end of the experiment, blood wascollected from the chicksto analyze plasma L-Cit and other free amino acids. The chemical analysis of WRP revealed a variety of com-ponentsincluding 19.1{\%} crude protein. L-Cit wasthe most abundant free amino acid in WRP (3.18 mg/g). Chronic supplementation of the WRP mash diet significantly increased compensatory food intake, plasma L-Cit, L-ornithine, and L-tyrosine in chicks. WRP mash diet did not affect the body temperature of the chicks. In conclusion, WRP mash diet supplementation increased plasma L-Cit concentration in chicks. The increase in plasma L-Cit concentrations suggest that WR could be used as a natural source of L-Cit in chicks to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress.",
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